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Films

The 2022 TCM Classic Film Festival will cover a wide range of programming themes, including our central theme All Together Now: Back to the Big Screen. Working directly with the Hollywood studios, the world’s notable film archives, and private collectors, our programs feature some of the most revered movies of all time—many with new restorations—and long-lost gems.

In keeping with TCM tradition, all Festival screenings include special introductions to provide context about each film. Specific details about this unique fan experience will be announced in the weeks and months ahead, including guest appearances by actors, actresses, directors, producers and other key figures.

Announced films for 2022

7th HEAVEN (1927) 7th HEAVEN (1927)

The TCM Classic Film Festival brings this silent love story back to the big screen for an unforgettable moviegoing experience with live accompaniment by the Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra. Critics have hailed 7th Heaven as the quintessential expression of director Frank Borzage’s romanticism. One element of that is his inspired teaming of Charles Farrell,…

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AFTER THE THIN MAN (1936) AFTER THE THIN MAN (1936)

The second Thin Man film, starring William Powell and Myrna Loy as Nick and Nora Charles, set a pattern that would distinguish their films from other series. Unlike the Andy Hardy and Dr. Kildare features, which were shot inexpensively and quickly, with two or more released in a year, MGM waited two years before producing…

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All Of Me ALL OF ME (1984)

Nothing can keep Lily Tomlin’s indomitable spirit down. Although her character, a wealthy invalid, dies in the first act of this infectious comedy, her soul lives on by migrating into the body of lawyer Steve Martin. It’s part of her plan to inhabit the body of a healthy young woman (Victoria Tennant) to whom she…

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Angels With Dirty Faces (1938) ANGELS WITH DIRTY FACES (1938)

One of James Cagney’s best performances comes to life as never before in the theatrical premiere of a new restoration of this gangster classic. Angels with Dirty Faces traces the different lives of childhood friends Rocky Sullivan (Cagney) and Jerry Connolly (Pat O’Brien). An early crime ends with Rocky caught and sent to reform school,…

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ANNIE ANNIE (1982)

The sun has been coming out tomorrow for the past 40 years. In 1977, Columbia paid a record $9.5 million for the screen rights to the smash hit musical based on Harold Gray’s long-running comic strip and then spent five years getting it on screen. Aileen Quinn beat out a wide field to play the…

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Baby Face BABY FACE (1933)

In one of the movies that best define the pre-Code era (made before the enforcement of Hollywood’s strict Production Code), Barbara Stanwyck stars as tough, tough cookie Lily Powers, who—after fleeing her father’s Erie, PA, dive bar/brothel—sleeps her way to the top of a New York bank. Baby Face became even more pre-Code in 2004,…

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BLUE HAWAII (1961) BLUE HAWAII (1961)

Grab a seat by the pool as Elvis Presley takes his first on-screen trip to the Aloha State. Blue Hawaii did so well Presley’s manager, Colonel Tom Parker, made it the template for most of the King’s later movies. From then on, Elvis was frequently sent to exotic locations, surrounded with pretty girls, and given…

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Cocktail Hour (1933) COCKTAIL HOUR (1933)

One element of pre-Code films that particularly irked moralists was their presentation of independent women who approach sex and romance the way men do. Characters played by Ruth Chatterton, Barbara Stanwyck, and Mae West often practiced a policy of “love them and leave them.” In Cocktail Hour, Bebe Daniels aspires to join their ranks. She…

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COFFY (1973) COFFY (1973)

Cult writer-director Jack Hill and star Pam Grier were a match made in drive-in heaven. The two had worked together before on The Big Doll House (1971) and The Big Bird Cage (1972), but it was their creation of Coffy, a nurse who seeks revenge on the gangsters who turned her little sister into an…

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COMING HOME (1978) COMING HOME (1978)

As a sensitive treatment of the plight of veterans, this film is to the Vietnam War what The Best Years of Our Lives (1946) was to World War II. Jane Fonda was inspired by her friendship with Ron Kovic, the paraplegic veteran later played by Tom Cruise in Born on the Fourth of July (1989)….

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COOLEY HIGH (1975) COOLEY HIGH (1975)

One of the most influential African American films of the 1970s, this coming-of-age tale was inspired by writer Eric Monte’s experience growing up in Chicago’s Cabrini-Green housing project, where he attended the real Cooley Vocational High School. Indie studio American International Pictures developed his story and had the wisdom to hire a Black director, Michael…

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COUNSELLOR AT LAW (1933) COUNSELLOR AT LAW (1933)

Leonard Maltin, this year’s recipient of the Robert Osborne Award, personally chose this William Wyler-directed pre-Code drama to screen for his award ceremony. After cutting his teeth directing low-budget Westerns, Wyler moved into prestige productions with this adaptation of Elmer Rice’s hit play. Universal paid a then-high $150,000 for the screen rights to the tale…

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DINER (1982) DINER (1982)

Nobody at MGM/UA understood Barry Levinson’s directing debut, the story of a group of friends in 1959 Baltimore who hang around the local diner discussing their problems. The studio was planning to shelve the film until critic Pauline Kael, who had caught an early press screening, virtually shamed them into putting it out. Despite only…

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Dinner at Eight (1933) DINNER AT EIGHT (1933)

George Cukor started his long association with MGM by using this adaptation of George S. Kaufman and Edna Ferber’s hit play to help turn Jean Harlow into a star. He also captured some of the best screen work ever from John Barrymore, Marie Dressler, Wallace Beery, and Billie Burke. Like the original play, the film…

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The Legend of Drunken Master (1994) DRUNKEN MASTER II (1994)

One of Jackie Chan’s biggest hits and a film often ranked among the greatest action pictures ever made screens in a version rarely seen in the West. Chan had become a star with the comic action film Drunken Master (1978). It took him 16 years to bring this sequel, his first traditional martial arts film…

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E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL (1982) E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL (1982)

OFFICIAL OPENING NIGHT FILM It’s been 40 years since phoning home and flying bicycles became part of our collective movie culture. The film that surpassed Star Wars (1977) to become the top-grossing picture of all time (now ranking fourth when adjusted for inflation) celebrates its 40th anniversary and returns to the big screen in its…

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Evenings for Sale (1932) EVENINGS FOR SALE (1932)

Released shortly after the more famous Trouble in Paradise (1932), Evenings for Sale comes from that brief period when Herbert Marshall was a romantic leading man. Before moving on to playing wronged husbands, neglected suitors, and character roles, Marshall starred here as a penniless Austrian count on the verge of suicide. He’s pulled out of…

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FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH (1982) FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH (1982)

40 years ago, nobody involved with this teen comedy thought it would reach icon status. Yet despite mixed reviews, director Amy Heckerling’s wise, sometimes profane view of growing up in the San Fernando Valley has become an enduring favorite thanks to characters like Spicoli (Sean Penn), the eternally stoned surfer, worldly wise Linda (Phoebe Cates),…

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Fatal Attraction (1987) FATAL ATTRACTION (1987)

35 years ago, Glenn Close delivered one of her most iconic performances when she proudly proclaimed, “I’m not gonna be ignored!” Her Alex Forrest relentlessly stalks married lawyer Dan Gallagher (Michael Douglas) when he dumps her after a brief affair. The stylish erotic thriller triggered controversy when feminists complained that James Dearden’s script had been…

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THE FLAME AND THE ARROW THE FLAME AND THE ARROW (1950)

The idea for swashbuckler The Flame and the Arrow came from Nick Cravat, Burt Lancaster’s childhood friend who had worked with him in the circus. Cravat suggested he follow in silent star Douglas Fairbanks’s footsteps by making an action film in which he would perform all his own stunts. Writer Waldo Salt created a story…

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Fly-By-Night (1942) FLY-BY-NIGHT (1942)

Filmed two years before director Robert Siodmak made his first true noir film, Phantom Lady (1944), this comic thriller—now celebrating its 80th anniversary—is less noir than noir-adjacent. A young intern (Richard Carlson) tries to help an escaped mental patient (Martin Kosleck), only to end up on the run as a suspect after the man is…

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Force of Evil FORCE OF EVIL (1948)

Film noir often served as a critique of corruption in America. Few films, however, went as far as Force of Evil in laying the source of corruption at the feet of capitalism. John Garfield stars as a lawyer for the mob boss (Roy Roberts) who runs the numbers racket. His brother (Thomas Gomez) runs a…

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THE FRENCH WAY THE FRENCH WAY (1945)

Though filmed in 1940, the occupation of France during World War II kept this charming comedy off French screens for several years. The legendary Josephine Baker stars as Zazu, a singer enlisted to break up the romance between a modern-day Romeo and Juliet. Bernard (Georges Marchal) and Claire (Micheline Presle) are in love, but their…

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The Gay Divorcee (1934) THE GAY DIVORCEE (1934)

After their dance duet to “Carioca” in Flying Down to Rio (1933) stole the show from stars Dolores Del Rio and Gene Raymond, RKO was eager to reunite Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. They did not have to look far for material. Astaire’s last Broadway hit before coming to Hollywood had been Cole Porter’s The…

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GIANT (1956) GIANT (1956)

Producer-director George Stevens’s tribute to the Lone Star State has never looked better, with a dazzling restoration making its world premiere at the TCM Classic Film Festival. Based on Edna Ferber’s sprawling novel, the film traces three decades of Texas history, from the cattle-based, white-ruled economy of the 1920s to the oil-rich, more diverse world…

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The Group (1966) THE GROUP (1966)

From the 1920s to the ‘60s, the “young girl takes life by storm” subgenre was a Hollywood staple. It not only allowed for a crowd-pleasing mix of comedy and melodrama, but also provided a showcase for younger actresses, from Joan Crawford in Sally, Irene and Mary (1925) to Ann-Margret in The Pleasure Seekers (1964). No…

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THE GUNFIGHTER THE GUNFIGHTER (1950)

Often hailed as the first adult Western, The Gunfighter is a far cry from the two-dimensional shoot-em-ups churned out by B-movie units. This 20th Century-Fox production is top drawer all the way, from Henry King’s direction to Gregory Peck’s melancholy performance as a former gunfighter stuck with the label “fastest draw in the West.” His…

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Hail The Conquering Hero HAIL THE CONQUERING HERO (1944)

Writer-director Preston Sturges’s favorite of all his films—or as he put it, “the one with the least wrong with it”—takes on patriotism, heroism, and motherhood. Sturges had so loved working with Eddie Bracken on The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek (1944), he gave him the lead in his next film. Here, Bracken is a 4F tormented…

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THE HARVEY GIRLS (1946) THE HARVEY GIRLS (1946)

Judy Garland wins the West in this Technicolor genre mash-up. MGM had bought the rights to Samuel Hopkins Adams’s novel about Harvey House, the real-life restaurant chain that brought civilization to the West, as a vehicle for Lana Turner. Then one of Garland’s mentors, producer and arranger Roger Edens, saw Oklahoma!, which made him realize…

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HAS ANYBODY SEEN MY GAL? (1952) HAS ANYBODY SEEN MY GAL (1952)

The twenties don’t so much roar as purr in this charming comedy from director Douglas Sirk, now celebrating its 70th anniversary. Charles Coburn stars as a bachelor millionaire who wants to find out if the family of the woman who rejected his proposal decades ago deserve to inherit his money. He boards with them under…

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Heaven Can Wait (1978) HEAVEN CAN WAIT (1978)

A love story, a murder mystery, an outrageous farce, a spiritual fantasy, and a sports film—Warren Beatty and Buck Henry’s remake of Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941) has something for everyone. Before embarking on his dream project, Reds (1981), Beatty was looking for a way to get some directing experience. A character-driven comedy seemed the…

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High Noon (1952) HIGH NOON (1952)

Critics likened this tightly wound Western to a civics lesson. The tale of a U.S. marshal (Gary Cooper) who faces a quartet of gunmen on his own—when the town’s citizens refuse to help him—is filled with political resonance. Writer Carl Foreman, who was blacklisted during filming, later claimed to have based some scenes on his…

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HOUSEBOAT (1958) HOUSEBOAT (1958)

Cary Grant and Sophia Loren make a delightful romantic couple in this charming comedy. He’s a widowed diplomat estranged from his three young children. She’s the rebellious daughter of a controlling symphony conductor. They meet-cute when she finds one of his children, who has run away. Before long, she’s working as his maid on a…

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THE HUSTLER (1961) THE HUSTLER (1961)

With its gritty depiction of a world of pool halls and seedy hotel rooms, The Hustler marked a major departure from Hollywood glamour. There was nothing heroic about Paul Newman’s tortured pool hustler, “Fast Eddie” Felson, even when he stood up to George C. Scott’s Mephistophelian gambler. Yet the role has become iconic, capturing a…

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I, THE JURY (1953) I, THE JURY 3D (1953)

Although overshadowed by the justly acclaimed Kiss Me Deadly (1955), the first film to feature Mickey Spillane’s detective Mike Hammer has a lot to recommend it. The picture was adapted from the original Hammer novel by director Harry Essex, who captured the story’s tough-guy dialogue and moral ambiguity. When his best friend is murdered, Hammer…

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Invaders from Mars (1953) INVADERS FROM MARS (1953)

William Cameron Menzies had already distinguished himself as an Oscar-winning designer and the director of H.G. Wells’s visionary Things to Come (1936) when he helped turn this low-budget science-fiction movie into a cult favorite. His unique design style, marked by distorted sets and low-angle shots, sets this film apart from other 1950s fright fests. Rushed…

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It's Always Fair Weather (1955) IT’S ALWAYS FAIR WEATHER (1955)

Reunions on-screen and off- are at the heart of this surprisingly adult musical from MGM. Codirectors Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly had previously teamed for On the Town (1949) and Singin’ in the Rain (1952), written by Betty Comden and Adolph Green. In fact, their third and final collaboration was originally intended as a sequel…

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Jewel Robbery (1932) JEWEL ROBBERY (1932)

William Powell’s justly famous on-screen partnership with Myrna Loy has overshadowed another great team-up, his six pairings with Kay Francis. Starting at Paramount and moving to Warner Bros., they were the last word in sleek sophistication. Since all their films together were made before strict Production Code enforcement, they’re also surprisingly adult. In Jewel Robbery—their…

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THE JUNGLE BOOK (1967) THE JUNGLE BOOK (1967)

Frequently hailed for containing the best character animation ever—including the work of Disney Legend Floyd Norman, who played a vital role in the design and creation of the “Trust in Me” sequence, among others—Walt Disney’s adaptation of Rudyard Kipling’s stories was the last animated feature Disney personally supervised. To join the disparate stories, the writers…

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Key Largo (1948) KEY LARGO (1948)

Writer-director John Huston unleashed tropical fury on the screen, at least according to the film’s ads, with this combination of social commentary and gangster film. Producer Jerry Wald convinced him (with Richard Brooks cowriting) to turn Maxwell Anderson’s verse play about a Spanish Civil War deserter into the story of a World War II veteran…

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THE LAST OF SHEILA (1973) THE LAST OF SHEILA (1973)

Among their friends, musical theatre legend Stephen Sondheim and actor Anthony Perkins were famous for the elaborate games and scavenger hunts they staged around New York City. One player, Herbert Ross, was so impressed he suggested they write a movie together—and he ended up directing and producing what would be their only screenplay. In The…

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A League of Their Own (1992) A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN (1992)

Three decades ago, a reunion of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League led to the making of this comedy hit about the formation of one legendary team, the Rockford Peaches, with Geena Davis and Lori Petty playing sisters and star players. Director Penny Marshall was inspired by the similarly titled 1987 TV documentary about the…

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The Letter (1940) THE LETTER (1940)

From the opening shots of a Malayan rubber plantation at night to its final, moon-drenched garden scene, this is one of the most emotionally potent films directed by William Wyler. It also showcases Bette Davis in a stellar performance as Leslie Crosbie, an upper-class woman who pumps six bullets into a man then spends the…

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LILIES OF THE FIELD LILIES OF THE FIELD (1963)

60 years ago, the late, great Sidney Poitier made history when he agreed to star in a low-budget film.  Nobody except Poitier and producer-director Ralph Nelson believed in the adaptation of William Edmund Barrett’s novel about a Black veteran who builds a chapel in the American Southwest for a group of German nuns. United Artists…

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A Little Song, A Little Dance (2022) A LITTLE SONG, A LITTLE DANCE (2022)

All singing! All dancing! All rarely seen clips from the Paramount Archives! Come and see well-known stars like Fred Astaire, Nat King Cole, and Dorothy Dandridge and get acquainted with the likes of the Cackle Sisters, among many other surprises. Music in the movies has always been an essential element of the fantasy world it…

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Little Women (1949) LITTLE WOMEN (1949)

The fourth of seven big-screen adaptations of Louisa May Alcott’s beloved novel began as a project for independent producer David O. Selznick, who planned the film as a showcase for his future wife, Jennifer Jones, and a teenage Shirley Temple. When none of it seemed to be working, he sold the package, including already-built sets,…

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LIVE READ: I MARRIED A MONSTER FROM OUTER SPACE (1958)

“I know where to get our men—human men!” TCM Underground and SF Sketchfest premiere a unique take on a 1958 sci-fi classic, rooted in the days of live radio. Originally released on a double bill with The Blob, screenwriter Louis Vittes’s story tells of aliens who arrive on Earth to possess the bodies of humans…

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Lover Come Back (1961) LOVER COME BACK (1961)

Years before Mad Men became the latest in water cooler television, Doris Day and Rock Hudson took on the ad business in the second of their three romantic comedies. In a plot similar to Pillow Talk (1959), they play enemies—rival ad execs—who’ve never met but fall in love when Hudson pretends to be somebody else….

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MAISIE GETS HER MAN (1942) MAISIE GETS HER MAN (1942)

Ann Sothern usually did the heavy comedic lifting in her 10 screen appearances as Maisie Ravier, but for her sixth outing, MGM had her trade quips with Red Skelton as “Hap” Hixby, the Laugh Bandit. The studio was grooming the popular radio comic for screen stardom, and series films like the Maisie pictures were a…

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A Man Called Adam (1966) A MAN CALLED ADAM (1966)

From the animated credits playing over Benny Carter’s score to Sammy Davis, Jr.’s freewheeling, deeply felt performance as a trumpeter, this film is all jazz. Davis stars as a temperamental musician, as famous for his outbursts as his inspired playing. A meeting with a Civil Rights activist (Cicely Tyson) inspires him to get his life…

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Miracle Mile (1988) MIRACLE MILE (1988)

Part romantic comedy, part apocalyptic thriller, Miracle Mile was so unconventional it took almost a decade to get to the screen. Steve De Jarnatt wrote it shortly after graduating from the American Film Institute and before long, the script had become a Hollywood legend, named one of the industry’s best unproduced screenplays. One good thing…

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NEBRASKA (2013) NEBRASKA (2013)

Alexander Payne was so moved by Bob Nelson’s script for Nebraska that it became the first film he directed from someone else’s screenplay. That’s quite a vote of confidence from the man behind Election (1999) and Sideways (2004). For the role of a cantankerous, aging man who is convinced he’s won a million dollars, he…

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The Pajama Game (1957) THE PAJAMA GAME (1957)

In honor of Doris Day’s 100th birthday, the TCM Classic Film Festival presents her triumphant return to Warner Bros., the studio that made her a star. Studio head Jack Warner picked up the rights to this musical and Damn Yankees, two Broadway hits directed by George Abbott and choreographed by Bob Fosse. He wanted to…

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Paper Moon (1973) PAPER MOON (1973)

Tatum O’Neal became the youngest competitive Oscar winner in history when she was named Best Supporting Actress for her performance as the foul-mouthed nine-year-old con artist in this nostalgic look at the Depression-era Midwest. She costars with her real-life dad (Ryan O’Neal) as a swindler who, after her mother’s funeral, agrees to drive her to…

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PEGGY SUE GOT MARRIED PEGGY SUE GOT MARRIED (1986)

What would you change if you could relive your formative years? Peggy Sue Got Married offers one answer with Kathleen Turner as an unhappy woman on the verge of divorce who suddenly travels back in time to her senior year of high school. Should she break up with the boyfriend (Nicolas Cage) who would later…

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POLYESTER POLYESTER (1981)

John Waters satirizes the women’s pictures of the 1950s, particularly those of Douglas Sirk, with this cult favorite that uses “Odorama” technology (scratch and sniff cards) for viewers to smell everything from flowers to flatulence at key points in the story. Whereas Sirk showcased glamorous stars like Lana Turner, the indie writer-producer-director presents the transgressive…

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Popi (1969) POPI (1969)

Director Arthur Hiller captured Spanish Harlem in all its bustling glory for this family comedy. Alan Arkin stars as a single father working three jobs to provide for his two sons (the wonderfully natural Reuben Figueroa and Miguel Alejandro). He dreams of making enough money to marry his girlfriend (Rita Moreno) and buy a nice…

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PORTRAIT OF JENNIE PORTRAIT OF JENNIE (1948)

Producer David O. Selznick’s labor of love about a labor of love was a tribute to the ethereal beauty of his protégée and future wife, Jennifer Jones. She stars as a young woman who appears several times to a struggling painter (Joseph Cotten), in each instance looking years older than before. Her visits inspire him…

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Pride of the Marines (1945) PRIDE OF THE MARINES (1945)

John Garfield found his favorite role of his career when he read a Life magazine story about Al Schmid, a Marine who lost his sight while fighting on Guadalcanal and had to readjust to life back home. Garfield campaigned for his studio, Warner Bros., to film the story and researched the part by visiting Schmid…

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Queen Bee (1955) QUEEN BEE (1955)

Joan Crawford was at her best and her worst when she made this lurid melodrama. As a Southern matriarch out to keep her former lover (John Ireland) from marrying her sister-in-law (Betsy Palmer), she’s evil personified. She trashes one rival’s bedroom and uses the engagement party to reveal her past affair. Yet Crawford plays it…

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RETURN OF THE SECAUCUS SEVEN (1980) RETURN OF THE SECAUCUS SEVEN (1980)

John Sayles’s directorial debut has been hailed as one of the movies that launched the Baby Boomer reunion genre and the American independent film movement. The tale of seven former student activists getting back together as they face their thirties was made without expectations of a theatrical release. Using money he’d made writing scripts for…

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Singin' In The Rain SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN (1952)

Though now considered by many to be the greatest musical Hollywood ever produced, Singin’ in the Rain famously received only two Oscar nominations—Best Supporting Actress (Jean Hagen) and Best Scoring of a Musical—and lost both. Through repeated television airings and revival-house screenings, along with changes in critical taste that have elevated the standing of once-undervalued…

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THE SLENDER THREAD (1965) THE SLENDER THREAD (1965)

Sidney Poitier stars as a crisis center employee who tries to keep a suicidal woman (Anne Bancroft) on the phone when she calls in after overdosing, in this recent restoration of Sydney Pollack’s big screen directorial debut. After nearly a decade of work as an actor and TV director, Pollack’s efforts here—along with composer Quincy…

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SOMEWHERE IN TIME (1980) SOMEWHERE IN TIME (1980)

Christopher Reeve enters a romantic fantasy of the past in this timeless love story. The actor was looking for a change of pace after his star-making turn in Superman (1978) and found it in the gentle tale of a playwright who travels back to 1912 in search of an early 20th century actress (Jane Seymour)…

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SOYLENT GREEN (1973) SOYLENT GREEN (1973)

Though this science-fiction thriller is set in 2022, rest assured that the poolside Tropicana Café offers much more appetizing fare than the stuff you’ll see on screen. Harry Harrison’s 1966 novel Make Room! Make Room! was inspired by a friend’s post-World War II warning that overpopulation was the greatest threat facing humanity. Harrison created a…

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Spartacus (1960) SPARTACUS (1960)

When Kirk Douglas lost the title role in Ben-Hur (1959) to Charlton Heston, he decided to make his own Roman epic. A move he would later call “childish” produced one of the great sword-and-sandal films, seen here a brand-new 70mm print. Loosely based on historical events, the film contrasts an escaped slave’s fight for freedom…

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Spy Smasher Strikes Back (1942) SPY SMASHER STRIKES BACK (1942)

In 1942, Republic Pictures released the 12-chapter serial action adventure, Spy Smasher, directed by William Witney and starring Kane Richmond and Marguerite Chapman. Based on a popular comic book character from Fawcett Publications, Spy Smasher tells the exciting tale of a costumed hero battling the Nazis in the early days of America’s entry into World…

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A Star Is Born (1937) A STAR IS BORN (1937)

One of the earliest feature films shot in three-strip Technicolor gets a fresh look in this theatrical premiere of a new restoration. Since Warner Bros. failed to renew its copyright in 1965, the film has been circulated in badly deteriorated versions that don’t do justice to the original vision of producer David O. Selznick, director-screenwriter…

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THE STING THE STING (1973)

Four years after the success of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), director George Roy Hill and stars Paul Newman and Robert Redford reunited for a film that not only topped the earlier picture’s box office but walked off with seven Oscars. The Sting depicts a massive con the team attempt to pull on…

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The Sunshine Boys (1975) THE SUNSHINE BOYS (1975)

George Burns reunited with movie fans for this comic tale of a vaudeville team getting back together after years of acrimonious estrangement. Though Neil Simon’s original play had been a hit, he and director Herbert Ross decided they needed a box office name in one of the lead roles. They brought in Walter Matthau, a…

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The Tall T (1957) THE TALL T (1957)

In this world premiere of a new 4k restoration, the second in a cycle of Westerns that Randolph Scott made with director Budd Boetticher is one of their most complex and entertaining. In an adaptation of Elmore Leonard’s “The Captives,” Scott plays a cowboy taken hostage by bandits, along with a pair of newlyweds. The…

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Tender Mercies (1983) TENDER MERCIES (1983)

The fourth time was the charm for Robert Duvall, who won an Oscar for his portrayal of a washed-up country singer after three earlier nominations. The role fit him like a glove, partly because of his long association with screenwriter Horton Foote, who also took home an Oscar for the film. Duvall had appeared in…

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The Third Man (1949) THE THIRD MAN (1949)

Dripping with atmosphere and moral ambiguity, The Third Man has been hailed as the best of the international noirs and one of the greatest British films ever made. American writer Holly Martins (Joseph Cotten) travels to postwar Vienna to see old friend Harry Lime (Orson Welles), only to learn Lime has died…or has he? A…

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THREE ON A MATCH (1932) THREE ON A MATCH (1932)

It’s hard to believe Bette Davis would ever have played third fiddle to two other actresses, but 90 years ago, she was newly arrived at Warner Bros. and had yet to establish her big-screen persona. Three schoolmates—played by Davis, Joan Blondell, and Ann Dvorak—reunite and share a cigarette, with the third to light hers proving…

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To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD (1962)

Gregory Peck finally made it into the Academy’s winner’s circle thanks to the release, 60 years ago, of this moving, inspirational drama. The adaptation of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel stars Peck as Atticus Finch, a small-town Alabama lawyer raising two children on his own. When he agrees to defend a Black man (Brock Peters)…

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TOO BUSY TO WORK (1932) TOO BUSY TO WORK (1932)

Will Rogers borrowed a page from Charlie Chaplin’s book 90 years ago when he played a tramp, albeit a slightly more dramatic one, in this remake of one of his biggest silent hits. The original, Jubilo (1919), had been only his third film and was so successful it cemented his transition from the Ziegfeld Follies…

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Tootsie (1982) TOOTSIE (1982)

In the early 1980s, drag was in at the Oscars, with Dustin Hoffman nominated for Best Actor for Tootsie, Julie Andrews up for Best Actress for Victor/Victoria (1982), and Barbra Streisand’s Yentl (1983) landing five nominations. With an original script by at least seven writers (even more are rumored), Tootsie didn’t have the pedigree of…

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TOPKAPI (1964) TOPKAPI (1964)

Having virtually created the international heist film with Rififi (1955), director Jules Dassin spoofed the genre with this lighthearted thriller based on Eric Ambler’s novel The Light of Day. Shot in Technicolor by Henri Alekan on locations in Turkey, Greece, and France—vividly rendered in this new restoration from The Film Foundation in collaboration with MGM—the…

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Waterloo Bridge (1940) WATERLOO BRIDGE (1940)

Vivien Leigh cemented her position as one of the screen’s great actresses by following her triumphant performance in Gone with the Wind (1939) with this wartime romance. Waterloo Bridge was the second big-screen version of Robert E. Sherwood’s play about a prostitute who falls in love with a soldier during World War I. For the…

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Wim Wenders, Desperado (2020) WIM WENDERS, DESPERADO (2020)

From his first solo feature, Summer in the City (1971)—about a man searching for purpose after he’s released from prison—through his most recent, Pope Francis: A Man of His Word (2018)—a documentary about the current pope’s efforts to spread peace—German filmmaker Wim Wenders has been the poet laureate of wanderers and dreamers. His many films…

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THE WIZARD OF OZ THE WIZARD OF OZ (1939)

By now, the fantasy worlds of Kansas and Oz that MGM created on its backlot have become legendary. Dorothy’s fight to return home to Kansas continues to strike a chord with filmgoers. It’s hard to believe anybody but Judy Garland, whose 100th birthday comes June 10, was ever considered to play Dorothy. The role is…

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