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Films

The 2018 TCM Classic Film Festival will cover a wide range of programming themes, including our central theme Powerful Words: The Page Onscreen.  Working directly with the Hollywood studios, the world’s notable film archives and private collections, our programs feature some of the most revered movies of all time – many new restorations – and long-lost gems.

In keeping with TCM tradition, all Festival screenings include special introductions to provide context about each film.  Download Print Source Index

*Line-up Subject to Change.

ANNOUNCED FILMS FOR 2018

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  • CHRISTIE'S MYSTERIES
  • DISCOVERIES
  • ESSENTIALS
  • HARDBOILED HOLLYWOOD
  • NITRATE FILMS
  • POET'S CORNER
  • SCREEN TO STAGE
  • SHAKESPEARE IN THE DARK
  • SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS
  • THE POWER OF THE PRESS
  • THE WRITER'S BLOCK
  • TRIBUTES

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1938)

Quality and publicity were the hallmarks of David O. Selznick’s productions, and this fourth film adaptation of Mark Twain’s first novel, released 80 years ago, was no exception.

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An Invisible History: Trailblazing Women of Animation (Various)

As unseen as the celluloid canvas they worked on, women have been at the forefront of animation from the very beginning, yet their presence and artistic contributions have largely gone unrecognized, undocumented and have become virtually invisible.

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Animal House (1978)

Forty years ago, the gross-out comedy genre became mainstream when John Belushi, as John “Bluto” Blutarsky, shoved food in his mouth and then sent it flying out, announcing, “I’m a zit!” That moment was improvised, but it came in the middle of a surprisingly tightly plotted and observant take on college life penned by three National Lampoon writers.

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The Big Lebowski (1998)

With plot elements that include mistaken identity, long and short cons, a wheelchair bound millionaire, kidnapping and a pornographer, this Coen Brothers film seems to be set in a demented version of Raymond Chandler’s mean streets of Los Angeles.

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The Black Stallion (1979)

Teri Garr stars alongside Mickey Rooney, who received an Oscar nomination for his supporting role, in this drama about a resilient, shipwrecked boy and his bond with an Arabian stallion.

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Blessed Event (1932)

Any fan of the cynical, slyly sexual films that flourished before strict Production Code enforcement arrived in 1934, will treasure this fast-paced comedy starring Lee Tracy.

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Bull Durham (1988)

Writer-director Ron Shelton drew on his own experiences as an infielder in the minor leagues to create one of the greatest sports films, an exuberant, literate treatment of minor league baseball as a world of its own.

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Bullitt (1968)

Steve McQueen stars in this 50th anniversary action film featuring an iconic car chase sequence that helped earn the film an Oscar for Best Editing.

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The Charge of the Light Brigade (1936)

Of the eight films co-starring Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland, this romantic epic is one of the least seen, mainly due to complaints about the mistreatment of horses in the thrilling climactic charge inspired by Alfred Tennyson’s poem.

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Crackin’ Wise (Various)

“I never forget a face, but in your case I can’t wait to forget both of yours!” In the movies, there’s never that moment when you think, oh if only I’d said that! Movies have a cosmic ability of having its characters say the perfect comeback, comment or remark at the right time.

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Creature from the Black Lagoon in 3D (1954)

While most 1950s horror films focused on the skies for flying saucers or nuclear missiles, this nightmarish classic went underwater.

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Detour (1945)

On a minuscule budget and running a mere 68 minutes, director Edgar G. Ulmer creates a cynical worldview out of this bleak film noir than many big-budget Hollywood films can muster in two hours.

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The Exorcist (1973)

The horror film phenomenon that inspired four sequels, a TV series and innumerable nightmares started out as a 1971 novel by William Peter Blatty.

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Fail-Safe (1964)

Sidney Lumet directs Henry Fonda and Walter Matthau in a U.S. premiere restoration of this thrilling Cold War drama that finds the U.S. and the Soviet Union in a nuclear crisis.

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Finishing School (1934)

Frances Dee stars in this pre-Code drama, alongside Ginger Rogers, as a young woman who must cope with family problems and blossoming love while staying at a strict all-girls boarding school.

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Gigi (1958)

Even at 60, MGM’s tribute to turn-of-the-century Paris seems both fresh and sophisticated. As the big Hollywood musical was fading at the box office, Arthur Freed, possibly at the suggestion of star Leslie Caron, came up with the idea of turning Colette’s novella about a young girl raised to be a kept woman into a musical on the grand scale.

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Girls About Town (1931)

Kay Francis and Lilyan Tashman are two gold diggers who find themselves in a complicated situation when one of them falls in love with a young wealthy businessman (Joel McCrea) in George Cukor’s pre-Code comedy.

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Grand Prix (1966)

This Academy Award-winning technical marvel stars Eva Marie Saint and James Garner, who portrays a troubled race car driver as he makes his way around the European racing circuit.

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Hamlet (1948)

The 70th anniversary screening of Shakespeare’s unforgettable tale adapted by Laurence Olivier, which earned seven Oscar nominations and four wins including Best Picture and Lead Actor.

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HAROLD LLOYD: NEW DIMENSIONS IN SIGHT AND SOUND (Various)

esented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences at the Linwood Dunn Theater, with special guest Suzanne Lloyd, Harold Lloyd’s granddaughter.

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A Hatful of Rain (1957)

Eva Marie Saint plays the pregnant wife to a Korean War veteran battling a morphine addiction in this Fred Zinnemann drama.

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Heaven Can Wait (1978)

After years of working with some of the best directors in the business—including Elia Kazan, Arthur Penn and Robert Altman—Warren Beatty made his directorial debut, as co-director alongside writer-actor Buck Henry, with this graceful remake of Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941).

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His Girl Friday (1940)

In this Howard Hawks screwball comedy, Cary Grant stars as a newspaper editor that tries to lure his ex-wife (Rosalind Russell) back into his life the day before she remarries.

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How to Marry a Millionaire (1953)

Sixty-five years ago, writer-producer Nunnally Johnson dusted off Zoe Akins’ 1930 play The Greeks Had a Word for It to create a showcase for three of the screen’s biggest stars: Betty Grable, Lauren Bacall and Marilyn Monroe.

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I Take This Woman (1931)

A spoiled New York socialite (Carole Lombard) must confront a change in lifestyle and her family’s resentment towards her decision to marry a cowboy (Gary Cooper) she meets while out West.

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Intruder in the Dust (1949)

The world of William Faulkner was not one in which the Golden Age of Hollywood would normally set its movies. In fact, this adaptation of his 1948 tale of a proud black man threatened with lynching when he’s accused of murder was only the third of his works to be filmed.

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Kiss Me Deadly (1955)

This film is often hailed as one of the ultimate films noir in part because of its tough, sadistic hero and its search for “The Great Whatsit,” the MacGuffin to end all MacGuffins. Director Robert Aldrich hated Mickey Spillane’s original novel but thought he and screenwriter A.I. Bezzerides could make something of the best-seller.

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Kramer vs Kramer (1979)

Robert Benton’s tale of a couple dealing with divorce and the ensuing custody battle over their son earned five Academy Awards, including Best Director and Screenplay for Benton, Best Actor for Dustin Hoffman, Best Supporting Actress for Meryl Streep and Best Picture.

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Leave Her to Heaven (1945)

Gene Tierney stars as the beautiful yet dangerously selfish new wife of Cornel Wilde in this Oscar-winning film noir.

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A Letter to Three Wives (1949)

As with many Golden Age Hollywood films, the script for this adaptation of John Klempner’s A Letter to Five Wives went through several writers before reaching the screen, with each adding something special.

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The Lost Weekend (1945)

When Billy Wilder bought the rights to Charles R. Jackson’s novel about a writer burying his insecurities in drink, Hollywood had not yet dealt with alcoholism in a serious way.

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Love Finds Andy Hardy (1938)

Eighty years ago, the biggest problem facing a high-school boy like Andy Hardy (Mickey Rooney) was how to find a date for the Christmas Eve dance.

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Maurice (1987)

Adapted from the E.M. Forster novel, Oscar winner James Ivory directed Hugh Grant, in one of his earliest film roles, as a young man struggling to accept his sexuality in Edwardian England.

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The Merry Widow (1934)

For what would be his last operetta, director Ernst Lubitsch turned in a lavish production so witty and light-hearted it almost seemed to dance off the screen. MGM previously had a huge hit with Franz Lehár’s operetta in a 1925 silent film directed by Erich von Stroheim.

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Mickey Mouse Animated Shorts  (Various)

A collection of 20 animated shorts that features Walt Disney’s famous character in B&W and in color, starting with his debut in Steamboat Willie (1928).

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A Midsummer Nights Dream (1935)

Warner Bros. took a big chance at the box office with this adaptation of William Shakespeare’s classic comedy: stories from “The Bard of Avon” were considered too high-brow for the box office.

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The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek (1944)

After skewering the rich and famous in comedies like The Lady Eve and Sullivan’s Travels (both 1941), writer-director Preston Sturges unleashed his rampant wit on small-town America.

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Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939)

Even in 1939, this patriotic yet critical depiction of the U.S. Senate as, in one politician’s words, “the biggest aggregation of nincompoops on record,” was furiously controversial, with politicians threatening to have it banned.

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Murder on the Orient Express (1974)

This adaptation of Agatha Christie’s 1934 novel did the seemingly impossible: it not only captured the spirit of her work faithfully, but it also pleased the author, who was hesitant to sell the book’s film rights.

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My Brilliant Career (1979)

Judy Davis stars as an aspiring writer who wishes to choose a career over marriage, despite the best efforts of two competing suitors in director Gillian Armstrong’s adaption of the Miles Franklin novel.

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Night of the Living Dead (1968)

Fifty years ago, George A. Romero revolutionized the horror genre with this gritty black-and-white tale of seven people who hole up in a remote farmhouse while the zombie apocalypse rages outside.

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None Shall Escape (1944)

Presented in a world premiere restoration, Marsha Hunt stars as the former fiancée of a Nazi officer forced to confront his crimes on trial through the eyes of the witnesses testifying against him.

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The Odd Couple (1968)

If you’ve ever referred to a sloppy friend as Oscar or a neat freak as Felix, you can thank this picture, now celebrating its golden anniversary. The screen adaptation of Neil Simon’s classic comedy gave Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau, the latter re-creating his stage role, their ultimate co-starring vehicle.

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Once Upon A time in the West (1968)

Fifty years ago, director Sergio Leone was looking to put Westerns behind him when Paramount offered him a large budget and access to his favorite actor, Henry Fonda. The result was an epic Western now regarded as one of the masterpieces of the genre.

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Outrage (1950)

When actress-director-writer Ida Lupino came into the world a hundred years ago, there was little serious dialogue around issues of sexual assault and harassment. In her centennial year, however, a series of horrifying revelations about the prevalence of sexual abuse makes her pioneering 1950 consideration of the subject particularly relevant.

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The Ox-Bow Incident (1943)

Seventy-five years ago, in the midst of World War II, U.S. film audiences were not ready for this trenchant indictment against mob mentality, which caused this film to do poorly at the box office.

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Park Row (1952)

In this labor of love, maverick director Samuel Fuller, who had started out as a newspaperman, created this adoring tribute to the birth of American tabloid journalism in the 1880s.

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The Phantom of the Opera (1925)

In this iconic silent horror film, Lon Chaney, the “man with the thousand faces,” stars as a disfigured murderer who haunts the Paris Opera House in order to make an opera singer he loves a star.  This presentation will feature live musical accompaniment by Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra.

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Pink Panther Cartoons on the Big Screen: The Coolest Cat in Town (Various)

Fifty years ago, the biggest, classiest and coolest cartoon star in Hollywood was the Pink Panther. The character was created by cartoon veterans Friz Freleng and David DePatie for the opening titles of Blake Edwards’ live-action comedy hit starring Peter Sellers as the bumbling Inspector Clouseau.

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Places in the Heart (1984)

Writer/Director Robert Benton earned an Academy Award for his screenplay and Sally Field took home the Oscar for Best Actress starring as a Texas widow struggling to maintain her family farm during the Great Depression in this star-studded drama featuring John Malkovich, Danny Glover and Ed Harris.

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Point Blank (1967)

Film noir and the French New Wave come together effortlessly in this influential thriller. MGM had acquired the rights to Donald E. Westlake’s novel The Hunter and the studio wanted Lee Marvin to star. Marvin agreed on the condition that they hire English director John Boorman, who had only made one other feature.

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The Producers (1968)

This world premiere restoration celebrating its 50th anniversary stars Zero Mostel as a broke theatrical producer and Gene Wilder as his accountant, who decide to get rich by producing a Broadway musical flop. This opening night screening will feature a live pre-film conversation with writer, director, actor and producer Mel Brooks.

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The Raven (1963)

Fifty-five years ago, Roger Corman traded horror for humor with his fifth Edgar Allan Poe adaptation. It was also his fourth and final collaboration with writer Richard Matheson. The two had tried going for laughs in “The Black Cat,” the second story in their previous film Tales of Terror (1962).

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The Right Stuff (1983)

Thirty-five years ago, Philip Kaufman’s unvarnished depiction of the space program and its move from top-secret government project to PR bonanza was too far ahead of its time to succeed at the box office.

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The Roaring Twenties (1939)

Former newspaperman Mark Hellinger drew on his knowledge of real-life gangsters like Larry Fay, Moe Snyder and Hymie Weiss to create the story for what would be the glorious conclusion of Warner Bros. run of gangster films produced in the 1930s.

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Romeo and Juliet (1968)

Olivia Hussey and Leonard Whiting brought new life to director Franco Zeffirelli’s two-time Academy Award-winning adaptation of Shakespeare’s tale of star-crossed lovers.

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Scandal: The Trial of Mary Astor (2018)

Scandal: The Trial of Mary Astor is a documentary about a woman who had to make a choice after learning her personal—and very intimate—diaries had been stolen. As an actress, an employee of the Hollywood studios, it meant risking everything.

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Scarface (1932)

A murderous thug shoots his way to the top of the mobs while trying to protect his sister from the criminal life.

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The Set-Up (1949)

Robert Ryan is a washed-up boxer whose crooked manager bets against him to lose a rigged fight in the in this classic noir.

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The Sea Wolf (1941)

An escaped convict (Ida Lupino) and writer find shelter on a boat that mutinies against its ruthless captain (Edward G. Robinson) in this Michael Curtiz adaption of Jack London’s original novel. This screening features 14 minutes of missing footage from the original theatrical release.

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Show People (1928)

In this silent film, King Vidor directs Marion Davies in one of her most beloved comedic roles as a Georgia girl who must navigate the ups and downs of becoming a Hollywood star. This presentation will feature live musical accompaniment by musician Ben Model.

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Silk Stockings (1957)

When Fred Astaire smashed his trademarked top hat at the end of “The Ritz Roll and Rock,” it was more than the punch line to a musical send-up of pop music. It was the end of an era.

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Sounder (1972)

At a time when studio executives thought the only way to sell tickets to African-American audiences was with tales of urban violence, this film proved that a simple family story, impeccably realized, could triumph at the box office.

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Spellbound (1945)

Ingrid Bergman is a psychoanalyst who falls in love with her new boss Gregory Peck, a troubled amnesiac who may also be a killer, in Alfred Hitchcock’s surrealistic thriller.

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Stage Door (1937)

Katharine Hepburn and Ginger Rogers are aspiring actresses living together in a New York City boarding house in this star-studded, Oscar-nominated film.

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A Star is Born (1937)

Janet Gaynor stars as Vicki Lester, a rising Hollywood actress who falls for Norman Maine (Fredric March), a fading, alcoholic actor in this Oscar-winning William A. Wellman drama.

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The Story of G.I. Joe (1945)

Working from Ernie Pyle’s Pulitzer Prize-winning columns about the lives of military men fighting in World War II, director William A. Wellman created one of the most authentic war movies ever made.

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Strangers on a Train (1951)

Patricia Highsmith’s first novel proved a perfect match for Alfred Hitchcock’s key themes, particularly the transference of guilt and the duality of good and evil. In need of a hit after four flops in a row, he snapped up the rights and then teamed with mystery great Raymond Chandler to write the screenplay.

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Sunset Boulevard (1950)

In Billy Wilder’s three-time Academy Award-winning film, William Holden plays a failed screenwriter who falls into a complicated relationship with Norma Desmond, a faded silent film star played by silver screen legend Gloria Swanson.

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Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song (1971)

Melvin Van Peebles wrote, directed, produced and stars as a renegade pimp named Sweetback, who finds himself on the run from corrupt police officers in this game-changing thriller.

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The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974)

Walter Matthau stars as a lieutenant who must negotiate with armed hijackers for the safety of a New York City subway train in this thriller based on a novel by John Godey.

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The Ten Commandments (1956)

Featuring ground-breaking special effects, this Biblical epic, starring Charlton Heston as Moses and Yul Brynner as Pharaoh Ramesses II, marks legendary director Cecil B. DeMille’s final and most successful film. This screening will be preceded by a special presentation from Oscar-winning visual effects artists and sound designers Craig Barron and Ben Burtt.

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Them! (1954)

James Whitmore, Edmund Gwenn and James Arness take on giant ants in the first entry of the nuclear mutation subgenre.

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This Thing Called Love (1940)

It’s hard to imagine that a comedy about a married couple not having sex could be condemned by the Catholic Legion of Decency, but that was the case with the second screen version of Edwin J. Burke’s play.

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Three Smart Girls (1936)

Sometimes everything just comes together at the right time. Producer Joseph Pasternak and director Henry Koster had just returned from Europe to Universal Studios, which was on the brink of bankruptcy.

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Throne of Blood (1957)

Shakespeare’s Macbeth gets reimagined and set in feudal Japan in this Akira Kurosawa masterpiece about a warrior whose ambitious wife convinces him to murder his superior so that he can rise to glory.

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To Have and Have Not (1944)

Based on the novel by Ernest Hemingway, this Howard Hawks World War II drama stars Humphrey Bogart as an American emigrant and skipper-for-hire whose romance with a mysterious singer, played by Lauren Bacall in her big screen debut, is complicated by a French Resistance leader trying to escape persecution.

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To Whom It May Concern: Ka Shen’s Journey  (2010)

The definitive and true life story of Nancy Kwan, star of The World of Suzie Wong (1960) and Flower Drum Song (1961). Written, produced and directed by Brian Jamieson.

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Tunes of Glory (1960)

It’s rare for a first-time novelist to get the chance to adapt his or her work to the screen, but that’s exactly what happened with James Kennaway, who scored his biggest success with his 1956 novel set in the peacetime headquarters of an unnamed Scottish military regiment.

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When You Read This Letter (1953)

Jean-Pierre Melville, one of the inspirations behind the French New Wave movement, dismissed his fourth feature—made 65 years ago—as a commercial exercise that was only important because it made him enough money to open his own studio.

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Where the Boys Are (1960)

Throughout his career, producer Joe Pasternak was an expert at developing young talent like Deanna Durbin and Jane Powell. So when he came across Glendon Swarthout’s novel about teens on spring break in Fort Lauderdale, he snapped it up while it was still a galley.

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Wife vs. Secretary (1936)

During Hollywood’s Golden Age, the studios were always on the lookout for stories that could showcase their stars. Faith Baldwin was one of their most reliable sources, selling stories and novels to Hollywood that would become vehicles for Carole Lombard, Margaret Sullavan, Henry Fonda and others.

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Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? (1957)

After Twentieth Century-Fox bought and then rewrote his hit play The Seven Year Itch (1955), George Axelrod retaliated with a play about a writer selling his soul to the devil for Hollywood success.

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Windjammer: The Voyage of Christian Radich (1958)

This visually stunning film, the only film ever shot in the widescreen Cinemiracle process, captures the voyage of the ship Christian Radich across the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea with stops at exotic ports of call.

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Witness for the Prosecution (1957)

Charles Laughton is the defense lawyer for an accused murderer (Tyrone Power), whose case is complicated when his wife (Marlene Dietrich) takes the stand in this Billy Wilder courtroom drama.

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Woman of the Year (1942)

Sparks flew between Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy on screen and off in this Oscar-winning romantic comedy, the first of Hepburn and Tracy’s nine collaborations together, directed by George Stevens.

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The World of Suzie Wong (1960)

Adapted from the novel by Richard Mason and the stage play by Paul Osborn, William Holden stars as an artist who falls in love with a Hong Kong sex worker portrayed by Nancy Kwan in her film debut.

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The World’s Greatest Sinner (1962)

One of the screen’s most eccentric, impassioned actors, Timothy Carey, produced this strange, underground classic with a little help from a young Frank Zappa, who wrote the score.

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