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A central focus of the 2023 TCM Classic Film Festival will be the celebration of the enduring legacy of Warner Bros., which marks its 100th anniversary on April 4, 2023. In conjunction with Warner Bros. Discovery’s centennial WB100 campaign, Celebrating Every Story, the TCM Classic Film Festival will shine a spotlight on some of the studio’s landmark creations.

A special WB100 programming theme will bring several of Warner Bros. most notable movies and stars back to the big screen for audiences to rediscover, including live appearances from some of the incredible talent that worked on these films, both in front of and behind the camera, and industry experts who will explore the significance and impact of the Warner Bros. legacy across the past century, today and into the future.

Announced WB100 Films

Casablanca (1942)

Timing is everything. Casablanca was more than just one of the supreme achievements of the Hollywood studio system. Like many great films, it was the result of a series of lucky breaks. The script for Murray Burnett and Joan Alison’s unproduced play Everybody Comes to Rick’s arrived at the Warner Bros. story department December 8,…

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Clash of the Wolves (1925) Clash of the Wolves (1925)

We might not be celebrating the Warner Bros. centennial this year were it not for the star that helped put the studio on the map during the silent era. It wasn’t John Barrymore, Irene Rich, or any other two-legged performer. It was a German shepherd born on a World War I battlefield in France and…

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Cool Hand Luke (1967) Cool Hand Luke (1967)

From John Garfield in the 1930s to James Dean and Marlon Brando in the 1950s, rebels have long ruled at the box office. With protests against the Vietnam War and racial injustice in the 1960s, they became particularly popular, and 1967 was a watershed year. Warren Beatty turned Depression-era outlaw Clyde Barrow into an anti-establishment…

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Crossing Delancey (1988) Crossing Delancey (1988)

Even with three features under her belt, including her arthouse breakthrough, Hester Street (1975), director Joan Micklin Silver had trouble securing funding for this adaptation of Susan Sandler’s play about a young Jewish woman torn between the culturally upscale world where she works and her roots on the Lower East Side. It wasn’t until she…

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East of Eden (1955) East of Eden (1955)

When director Elia Kazan realized Marlon Brando and Montgomery Clift were too old to play the brothers in his adaptation of John Steinbeck’s East of Eden, he went looking for new talent. Boy, did he find it! In his first starring role (and the only one of his major films released during his lifetime), James…

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Enter The Dragon (1973) Enter the Dragon (1973)

Fifty years ago, the martial arts film entered the U.S. mainstream with the success of this high-octane action thriller. Bruce Lee stars as a martial artist and intelligence agent who infiltrates a tournament on crime lord Han’s forbidden island. His goal isn’t just to win. He wants to destroy Han’s criminal empire and avenge his…

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The Exorcist (1973)

Even with the passage of 50 years, two sequels, two prequels, a TV series, and numerous rip-offs, this adaptation of William Peter Blatty’s novel remains one of the most unsettling horror films ever made. The tale of a movie star’s daughter possessed by a demon created a national furor. There were reports of audience members…

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Footlight Parade (1933) Footlight Parade (1933)

Ninety years ago, audiences flocked to stay at the “Honeymoon Hotel” before meeting “Shanghai Lil” “By a Waterfall” in the third of Warner Bros.’ great Busby Berkeley extravaganzas. Earlier in 1933, 42nd Street had revived the film musical, thanks largely to Berkeley’s imaginative dance routines and the teaming of Dick Powell and Ruby Keeler. Gold…

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House of Wax (1953) House of Wax 3D (1953)

The 3D fad of the 1950s was at its height 70 years ago when Warner Bros. conquered the genre with this horror remake directed by André De Toth, a man with ironically only one eye. Of course, you didn’t need two eyes to follow the gimmick’s formula by throwing everything from paddle balls to a…

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The In-Laws (1979) The In-Laws (1979)

Lunacy reigns supreme in this unlikely buddy picture. Writer Andrew Bergman was riding high on the success of his first screenplay, Blazing Saddles (1974), when Warner Bros. approached him with an offer. Alan Arkin and Peter Falk wanted to do a film together, and he was given the chance to write it. The pairing of…

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Larceny, Inc. (1942) Larceny, Inc. (1942)

Edward G. Robinson ended his original Warner Bros. contract with a spoof of the roles that had made him a star. As adept at comedy as he was at heavy drama, he scores a personal success in this caper film helmed by versatile director Lloyd Bacon, aided by a great supporting cast including Harry Davenport,…

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A Mighty Wind (2003) A Mighty Wind (2003)

With this warmhearted lampoon of the world of folk music, writer-director-actor Christopher Guest transitioned from the blistering satire of earlier films like Waiting for Guffman (1996) and Best in Show (2000) to a more affectionate tone. As with the earlier films, Guest and co-writer Eugene Levy created a detailed scenario and then turned their cast…

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Mister Roberts (1955) Mister Roberts (1955)

Warner Bros. publicists dubbed Thomas Heggen and Joshua Logan’s Mister Roberts “the happiest play that ever played.” Things were certainly happy at the box office, with the film becoming the third-highest earner of its year. But that wasn’t the case off screen, where the production ended the 16-year friendship between star Henry Fonda and director…

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Mr. Cohen Takes a Walk (1935) Mr. Cohen Takes a Walk (1935)

Director William Beaudine was at the height of his career when he, along with Raoul Walsh and Allan Dwan, answered a call from Great Britain’s film studios to help bolster their industry by making pictures there. At the time he was commanding $2,000 per week on the strength of Mary Pickford hits like Little Annie…

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The Music Man (1962) The Music Man (1962)

Hollywood’s biggest singing stars, Frank Sinatra and Bing Crosby, tried to buy the rights to Meredith Willson’s musical portrait of a small-town con artist, but Willson held out for the show’s original star, Robert Preston. That’s the kind of grit it took for the composer to bring his first musical to Broadway in the first…

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Ocean's Eleven (2001) Ocean’s Eleven (2001)

“They’re having so much fun it’s illegal,” read this film’s tagline, and fun was indeed the motivation behind director Steven Soderbergh’s remake of the Rat Pack’s 1960 hit. After making a sprawling and very serious take on the drug trade, Traffic (2000)—for which he would win an Oscar—he assembled a friendly group of A-listers, encouraged…

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The Old Maid (1939) The Old Maid (1939)

British-born Edmund Goulding was noted for his ability to get great performances out of actors, from Greta Garbo in Grand Hotel (1932) to Tyrone Power in the original Nightmare Alley (1947). He’d already directed Bette Davis twice—in That Certain Woman (1937) and Dark Victory (1939)—when he stepped in as referee between her another notably temperamental…

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One Way Passage (1932) One Way Passage (1932)

Before he teamed with Myrna Loy to play the perfect sophisticated couple in the Thin Man series at MGM, William Powell was paired with another glamorous leading lady, Kay Francis. They made six films together—four at Paramount and two at Warner Bros.—all just as sophisticated but with a risqué pre-Code edge, to boot. Their last…

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Rio Bravo (1959) Rio Bravo (1959)

After the box-office failure of Land of the Pharaohs (1955), director Howard Hawks took some time off to travel the world before returning to one of the genres he had long mastered, the Western. Where some of his earlier Westerns had been filled with action, however, Rio Bravo is more about character. The tale of…

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Risky Business (1983) Risky Business (1983)

A pair of tighty-whities and some of that old time rock and roll made Tom Cruise a star 40 years ago. The iconic image of him dancing to Bob Seger’s classic (by George Jackson and Tom E. Jones III) has tended to upstage the many considerable merits of this social satire, written and directed by…

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Stand and Deliver (1988) Stand and Deliver (1988)

In the late ‘80s, director Ramón Menéndez scored a breakthrough success with this fact-based film about inspirational high-school math teacher Jaime Escalante. It wasn’t just that he and co-writer Tom Musca were working on their first feature film. At a time when Hollywood producers were considering casting white actresses like Meryl Streep or Jessica Lange…

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The Strawberry Blonde (1941) The Strawberry Blonde (1941)

“Warner Night at the Movies” has been a highlight of many of the Warner Bros. special edition Home Video releases. This unique presentation by Warner Bros. Discovery’s Library Historian George Feltenstein will recreate the typical moviegoing experience from Hollywood’s golden age, complete with cartoons, short subjects, and trailers from the era, followed by the studio’s…

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The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1949) The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)

Actor Walter Huston had always told his son, John, that if he ever became a writer, he should create a good part for him. 75 years ago, John Huston did just that, though it wasn’t the part he’d originally intended. When he first encountered B. Traven’s novel, loosely inspired by “The Pardoner’s Tale” from Chaucer’s…

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The Wild Bunch (1969) The Wild Bunch (1969)

Director and co-writer Sam Peckinpah dragged the Western into the era of Vietnam and political protest with his revisionist view of an outlaw band looking to make one last score. It wasn’t just that he transformed violence from occasional garnish on a tale of action and heroism into an essential part of the world depicted…

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