Schedule **Schedule is subject to change

ASK LEONARD MALTIN

Club TCM at The Hollywood Roosevelt

Don’t miss your chance to get to know one of the most recognized film critics and historians, Leonard Maltin. In this one-hour Q&A, Maltin will answer audience questions about his 50 year career as a writer, television host and interviewer. He's met everyone from Buster Keaton to Katharine Hepburn, and looks forward to sharing his stories with TCM fans.

A CONVERSATION WITH DICK CAVETT AND BOOK SIGNING

Club TCM at The Hollywood Roosevelt

Don’t miss this one-hour conversation with iconic interviewer Dick Cavett. Cavett made a name for himself in the 1960s and 70s as the host of his own groundbreaking television show, The Dick Cavett Show. As a talk show host and personality, Cavett interviewed the likes of Bette Davis, Groucho Marx, Katharine Hepburn, Ingmar Bergman, Danny Kaye, Marlon Brando and many more during the various incarnations of his broadcast. Cavett’s likable persona, erudite conversational skills and wit has made him a staple in popular culture for generations, and he has garnered seven Emmy nominations and two wins throughout his career. Cavett has managed to draw intelligent anecdotes and tales from some of the greatest stars he has conversed with, while also bringing his own charm and humor into the homes of many.  Book signing is immediately after event.

OFFICIAL CLOSING NIGHT PARTY

Club TCM at The Hollywood Roosevelt

Join Ben TCM and your fellow passholders as we celebrate new friends, new memories and our shared love of classic movies.  Please refer to the back of your pass for entrance eligibility.

BONNIE AND CLYDE ( 1967 )

ESSENTIALS

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Despite studio opposition and pans from the more conservative critics, this revisionist gangster film helped change the face of Hollywood. When producer-star Warren Beatty presented his tale of the legendary 1930s bank robbers to Warner Bros., the studio consigned it to drive-ins and second-run theatres. It took praise from a new generation of critics (including a lengthy rave by Pauline Kael) and the enthusiasm of young audiences to convince them to reopen the film in first-run theatres, where it became a huge hit. Bonnie and Clyde ushered in a new era of filmmaking with anti-establishment plots aimed at younger audiences and gave a new focus for visionary directors like Arthur Penn and stars like Beatty creating their own projects. The film made Faye Dunaway a star, but though she and Beatty were conventionally glamorous, the supporting cast—headed by Oscar winner Estelle Parsons, Michael J. Pollard and Gene Hackman in his breakout role—suggested a move toward casting actors with more unconventional features. The picture grossed more than $70 million worldwide and earned 10 Oscar nominations, five of them for acting. It won for Estelle Parsons’ supporting performance and Burnett Guffey’s cinematography. (d. Arthur Penn, 111m, DCP)

THE PALM BEACH STORY ( 1942 )

DIVORCE/REMORSE

TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX

Preston Sturges hit a career high 75 years ago with the release of his most thoughtful comedy, Sullivan’s Travels (1941), and this comedy of tangled romance. Released shortly after the U.S. entered World War II, THE PALM BEACH STORY offered a welcome relief from war news but also became the last great screwball comedy, as the nation’s tastes turned more serious. Claudette Colbert and Joel McCrea star as a married couple in a financial slump. She comes up with a unique plan to divorce so she can snare a rich husband to finance McCrea’s inventions. When Rudy Vallee turns up as the good-spirited mark (in a role modeled on John Rockefeller) and his sister, a much-married princess Mary Astor, sets her cap for McCrea, the stage is set for hilarity. Sturges had grown up in the world of international society and was married to a socialite at the time, so he drew on his observations of the upper crust at its silliest. The glamorous sets, costumes and the star’s salaries also made this one of his most expensive comedies. The film also showcases favorite character players like William Demarest, Robert Dudley and Robert Warwick. (d. Preston Sturges, 88m, DCP)

SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN ( 1952 )

FESTIVAL TRIBUTES

TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX

When MGM producer Arthur Freed okayed a musical about the early days of talking pictures built around the songs he and Nacio Herb Brown had written for some of the first film musicals, they needed the perfect ingénue to play the chorus girl who rises to stardom dubbing a screechy voiced silent screen siren (Jean Hagen). Debbie Reynolds had scored with supporting performances in Three Little Words and Two Weeks with Love (both 1950). Though not a trained dancer, she had even toured theatres to perform with co-star Carleton Carpenter, a more experienced song and dance man. Because of her gymnastics training, co-directors Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen thought she could do it, though the former drove her mercilessly. With her usual determination and an unofficial assist from Fred Astaire, who helped coach her, she scored big as Kathy Selden. In addition to joining Kelly for a lilting pas de deux to “You Were Meant for Me,” she matched him and Donald O’Connor step for step in the big tap number set to “Good Morning.” It took 15 hours to capture the number, by which time her feet were bleeding, but everybody knew a star had been born. (d. Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly, 103m, DCP)

CASABLANCA ( 1942 )

ESSENTIALS

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Renew a beautiful friendship with one of the most entertaining of all classic films. Casablanca has been hailed as a shining example of the Hollywood studio system at its best and will be shown at the Festival to celebrate its 75th anniversary. It was written by committee—four writers, producer Hal Wallis, director Michael Curtiz and even star Humphrey Bogart, who contributed the line “Here’s looking at you, kid.” Curtiz was a studio stalwart who did his work with Wallis and studio head Jack Warner looking over his shoulder. The whole thing was packaged to promote Warner Bros.’ stars Bogart and Paul Henreid; showcase contract talent like Claude Rains, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre and S.Z. Sakall; and take full advantage of the studio back lot, sound stages and behind-the-camera talent. The major departure from the Warner Bros. family was Ingrid Bergman, who was borrowed from independent producer David O. Selznick. She’s the perfect addition, however, to this tale of an American expatriate (Bogart) torn between his refusal to get involved in the fight against Nazi Germany and his love for a beautiful woman (Bergman) married to a Resistance leader, (Henreid). The film captured America’s spirit at the start of World War II and continues to speak to new generations of would-be-rebel heroes. (d. Michael Curtiz, 102m)

THE EGG AND I ( 1947 )

DISCOVERIES

Egyptian Theatre

Universal’s first big hit after its merger with International Pictures gets a new look in this world premiere restoration. Betty MacDonald’s memoir about her life in Chimacum Valley, WA—and the squalors of running a chicken farm—held a place on the bestseller list for a year and half when the new Universal-International outbid older, more profitable studios. They then had the wisdom to reteam Claudette Colbert and Fred MacMurray for the sixth of their seven films together. MacMurray’s pixilated office worker turned farmer points to the comic roles he would play for Disney in later years, while Colbert’s sophistication makes her the perfect choice for a city-loving woman who constantly struggles with a wood-burning stove and takes pratfalls in a pig pen. The real stars of the film, however, are Marjorie Main and Percy Kilbride as the neighboring farmers, Ma and Pa Kettle, who rule over a brood of wild children in a tumbledown shack. Not only did Main earn a Best Supporting Actress nomination, but audiences took to them so well they would form the basis of a series of nine popular films released over the next decade. This screening will include the short "Walky Talky Hawky." (d. Chester Erskine, 108m, DCP)

THE LANDLORD ( 1970 )

FESTIVAL TRIBUTES

Egyptian Theatre

Although a flop on its initial release, this trenchant dramedy about race relations has developed a cult following built around the career of director Hal Ashby. Bill Gunn’s adaptation of Kristin Hunter’s novel stars Beau Bridges as a one-percenter who buys an apartment building in pre-gentrified Park Slope, Brooklyn, hoping to turn it into a swinging bachelor pad. When he gets to know his African-American tenants (a marvelous cast including Diana Sands, Pearl Bailey and Louis Gossett, Jr.), he decides to let them stay, moves in and starts improving the building. He also has affairs with a mixed-race art student (Marki Bey) and married woman Sands. All of this horrifies his domineering, racist mother, played to a tee by Lee Grant. The film brought her an Oscar nomination, and cementing her return to Hollywood after years on the black-list. The picture was originally slated for Norman Jewison, but when his schedule filled up he turned it over to Ashby, who had won an Oscar for editing IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT (1967). It was the start of a brilliant directing career marked by such favorites as HAROLD AND MAUDE (1971) and Being There (1979). (d. Hal Ashby, 112m, 35mm)

WHAT’S UP, DOC? ( 1972 )

FESTIVAL TRIBUTES

Egyptian Theatre

When it came time for Peter Bogdanovich to make a follow-up to his breakthrough with THE LAST PICTURE SHOW (1971), no one could have expected he’d follow the powerful drama with this daffy comedy. A product of his love for classic Hollywood comedies, particularly the screwball genre, and his appreciation of Barbra Streisand’s comic talents, he created a spin on Howard Hawks’ Bringing Up Baby (1938), with Streisand as the liberating, madcap female in the mold of Katharine Hepburn and Carole Lombard and Ryan O’Neal as the tight-laced academic (read Cary Grant, down to the horn-rimmed glasses), whose life she turns upside down. The stars are a delight, with Streisand even getting to sing a bit of “As Time Goes By” and O’Neal spoofing his earlier hit Love Story (1970). They’re not the whole show, however. Co-writer Buck Henry fleshed out the supporting characters in David Newman and Robert Benton’s script to create gemlike roles for Madeline Kahn (in her feature debut) as O’Neal’s dictatorial fiancée, Kenneth Mars as a supercilious critic, Randy Quaid as a rival academic and Austin Pendleton as a pixilated tycoon. (d. Peter Bogdanovich, 94m, 35mm)

LADY IN THE DARK ( 1944 )

NITRATE

Egyptian Theatre

Director Mitchell Leisen’s background as a set and costume designer informs every frame of this glamorous adaptation of the Broadway musical. Ginger Rogers stars as a magazine editor who is stricken with a bout of indecisiveness, and sees a psychiatrist to analyze her dreams. The real-world scenes are sophisticated comedy as she copes with her romantic attraction to her married publisher (Warner Baxter), her insolent second-in-command (Ray Milland) and a movie star (Jon Hall). For her dreams, the film becomes a musical, though little was left of the classic Kurt Weill and Ira Gershwin score by the time the movie hit theatres. As a compensating factor, however, Leisen pulled out the stops turning her dreams about high society, a marriage and the circus into lush visual displays. Edith Head did the costumes for the non-dream scenes, with Broadway designer Raoul Pene du Bois designing sets and costumes for the dreams. Leisen contributed his own ideas, including the jewel-lined mink gown Rogers wears in the circus dream. When the first gown proved too heavy for Rogers to walk in much less dance, du Bois got his friend, Madame Karinska, to build a lighter version. The original is now on display at the Smithsonian Institution.  Nitrate projection made possible through support of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, Turner Classic Movies and The Film Foundation in partnership with the American Cinematheque and the Academy Film Archive. 35mm nitrate print courtesy the UCLA Film and Television Archive and Universal Pictures. (d. Mitchell Leisen, 100m, Nitrate)

DR. STRANGELOVE: OR HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYINGAND LOVE THE BOMB DR. STRANGELOVE ( 1964 )

DARK COMEDY

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Stanley Kubrick and screenwriter Terry Southern combined the Cold War with rampant sexuality in a political satire that seems as timely today as it was in 1964. The tense plot could have been played for straight melodrama: a rogue general circumvents military failsafes to send a nuclear warhead into the Soviet Union as the U.S. president tries to avert assured mutual destruction. With character names like Jack D. Ripper and Buck Turgidson, however, the film becomes a searing black comedy. In a field of strong performances from George C. Scott, Sterling Hayden and Keenan Wynn, Peter Sellers—in three roles—is the glue holding the film together. Sellers earned an Oscar nomination for playing Ripper’s British aide, the eternally put-upon U.S. president and a deranged German scientist helping to plan the nuclear endgame. Along with the brilliance of its execution, DR. STRANGERLOVE is also important as the first film in which Kubrick paired established musical pieces with images, as when he plays “Try a Little Tenderness” over the opening shots of bombers preparing for takeoff. That scene anticipates his use of the “Blue Danube Waltz” in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) and “Singin’ in the Rain” in A Clockwork Orange (1971). (d. Stanley Kubrick, 95m, DCP)

THE FRONT PAGE ( 1931 )

DISCOVERIES

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The newspaper film—with its fast-paced dialogue, hardboiled characters and rampant cynicism—was born when Howard Hughes hired Lewis Milestone to direct the first of four big-screen adaptations of Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur’s hit play. Shot before the days of strict Production Code enforcement, the film is the closest to the original, although part of the famous last line had to be drowned out by the clatter of typewriters. In this version, unscrupulous editor Adolphe Menjou fights to keep star reporter Pat O’Brien from retiring. The big lure is the chance to cover a sensational execution. Milestone kept the camera moving to disguise the fact that most of the action took place in a single room and used overlapping dialog to capture the frenetic pace of a reporter’s life. He also assembled a top cast of character actors, including Edward Everett Horton, Walter Catlett, George E. Stone and Frank McHugh. Like many of Hughes’ independent productions, The Front Page fell into the public domain, leading to the proliferation of inferior prints. In 2016, TheAcademy Film Archive and The Film Foundation created this restored version using funding provided by the George Lucas Family Foundation. Elements for this restoration from original negatives provided by The Howard Hughes Corporation and by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, College of Fine Arts’ Department of Film and its Howard Hughes Collection at the Academy Film Archive. (d. Lewis Milestone, 101m, DCP)

POSTCARDS FROM THE EDGE ( 1990 )

FESTIVAL TRIBUTES

Chinese Multiplex House 1

To set the record straight, Carrie Fisher’s adaptation of her semi-autobiographical novel is not a point-by-point revelation of her relationship with her mother, Debbie Reynolds. Rather, it’s loosely inspired by Fisher’s experiences with addiction, making low-budget movies and show-biz families. In fact, Liza Minelli once told her the mother-daughter relationship reminded her of her own relationship with Judy Garland. And when Reynolds submitted herself for the mother role, director Mike Nichols told her she wasn’t right for it. However, the film is a brilliantly witty look at a young woman’s attempt to find her own identity independent of family and scandal. Nichols’ paint-box colors perfectly capture the artificiality of Hollywood, providing an ironic contrast to the backbiting and treachery under the surface. Meryl Streep won an Oscar nomination for playing the main character but Shirley MacLaine should have. The film also features supporting work from Dennis Quaid as an unscrupulous producer, Gene Hackman as Streep’s director, Mary Wickes as her grandmother, Annette Benning as a young actress and Richard Dreyfuss as a doctor. (d. Mike Nichols, 101m, DCP)

HELL IS FOR HEROES ( 1962 )

HEY, THAT'S NOT FUNNY

Chinese Multiplex House 1

This war film’s bleak view of military action, loner hero (Steve McQueen) and abrupt finish has brought it a cult following, intrigued by its depiction of a U.S. squad left to guard the Siegfried line from a much stronger German force. The script was by World War II veteran Robert Pirosh, who based it on events that took place when his unit was pulled from the Vosges region to aid in the Battle of the Bulge, leaving a small group behind to defend the line. Pirosh was supposed to direct, but withdrew after repeated arguments with McQueen. When Don Siegel came on, he cut most of Pirosh’s more comic scenes, but was forced to leave in one sequence featuring Bob Newhart, in his film debut. With Newhart’s rising fame as a comic, noted for his one-sided phone conversations, the studio made Siegel keep in a fake phone call designed to fool the Germans, written by Newhart. Although Siegel wanted this to be an anti-war film, he wasn’t responsible for the abrupt, almost absurdist ending. Paramount Pictures cut the budget, forcing Siegel to omit the originally planned finale. The lack of a big finish, however, made the film even more powerful. (d. Don Siegel, 90m, DCP)

SPEEDY ( 1928 )

SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS

Chinese Multiplex House 1

This special screening of one of Harold Lloyd’s most popular films recaptures the silent film experience with the Alloy Orchestra performing of their original score, live accompaniment. In his last silent film, Lloyd stars as an ardent baseball fan trying to save the horse-drawn trolley line run by his girlfriend’s grandfather. The film has all of his trademarks: skilled character comedy as he tries to share the results of a Yankees game with his fellow employees at a crowded soda shop and a daredevil chase as he tries to prove the trolley is faster than the train threatening to replace it. Lloyd shot extensively in New York City, capturing the Big Apple as it was back in 1928. That proved a problem, however, as he was so popular they had to film the Coney Island scenes in secret to avoid his being mobbed. Another highlight is a cameo appearance by Babe Ruth (as himself) hailing a cab driven by Lloyd. Before he gets in, you can even spot Lou Gehrig passing by on the street. After the ride, Lloyd enters Yankee stadium for a game between the Yankees and the Chicago White Sox, featuring Ruth hitting a homer just for the cameras. (d. Ted Wilde, 85m, DCP)

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COCK OF THE AIR ( 1932 )

DISCOVERIES

Chinese Multiplex House 6

In the world of Hollywood before strict Production Code enforcement, you didn’t just tell the audience the leading lady was an irresistible temptress or the leading man a Don Juan. You showed it. This controversial romantic comedy stars Billie Dove as a sultry Parisian songstress who falls for womanizing pilot Chester Morris and sets out to tame him. As one of several films Howard Hughes produced on the heels of Hell’s Angels (1930), it recycles some of that film’s aerial sequences. The risqué romance led to major problems, with the Hayes Office forcing Hughes to cut up to 12 minutes from the released version, rendering the film’s plot incomprehensible in places. Ultimately, he sacrificed COCK OF THE AIR as a bargaining chip while trying to get Scarface (1932) approved. That might have been the end of it had not the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences come upon a complete, uncensored print in 2007. The only thing missing was the soundtrack. Restored by the Academy Film Archive in 2016, the archive hired actors to re-record the missing dialogue, adding music and sound effects, and even putting in white noise to duplicate the feeling of the vintage soundtrack. (d. Tom Buckingham, 80m, DCP)

LURED ( 1947 )

HEY, THAT'S NOT FUNNY

Chinese Multiplex House 6

Two refugees from MGM joined forces with one of the screen’s most supreme stylists to create this fascinating mix of film noir and romantic melodrama. Lucille Ball had just left MGM in search of better roles, when she signed with former studio producer Hunt Stromberg for this tale of a Victorian-era dance hall girl who tries to help Scotland Yard catch a serial killer. Under Douglas Sirk’s direction, the brooding atmosphere gives way to a claustrophobic view of upper-crust privilege as Ball falls for one of the suspects (George Sanders in a rare romantic role), even as she suspects he’s the one offing women he meets through personals ads. The film has a strong supporting cast, with Charles Coburn as her police detective boss, George Zucco as her undercover guard dog and Boris Karloff, Cedric Hardwicke, Joseph Calleia and Alan Mowbray as suspects. Although now a cult favorite among fans of Ball and Sirk, LURED flopped at the box office, mainly because the Production Code decided the title was too lurid and demanded it be changed to Personal Column during its initial release. (d. Douglas Sirk, 102m, DCP)

  • SARA KARLOFF

REPUBLIC PRESERVED ( 2014 )

SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS

Chinese Multiplex House 6

Get ready to view little seen moments from Republic Pictures preserved by Paramount Pictures Archives.  Paramount’s head archivist, Andrea Kalas, will show clips from these preserved movies, some of which haven’t been seen in decades. The Republic Pictures library is looked after by the Paramount Pictures Archives and in the past seven years, the archives have taken on a 100-title-a-year preservation program, preserving those films most urgently in need of preservation first (many of these have been from the Republic library).  The result of this program is that the films produced by this famous B-movie studio are now available for viewing, some of them for the first time since they were originally released. Westerns and the great cliffhanger serials are what Republic is known for, but there are also musicals, film noir and British collaborations during the era of the “Quota Quickie.” The program also highlights the great and early talents of John Wayne, Roy Rogers, Nathanael West, Allan Dwan and Anthony Mann. Great titles such as Yokel Boy (1942), Rendezvous with Annie (1946), Singing Guns (1950), Born to be Wild (1938) and Man of Conquest (1939), among many others, will be represented. It will be an all-singing, all-dancing, all-horse-riding, all-gangster-talking, all-cliffhanging, all-entertaining tour through the famous “Poverty Row” studio.

DETECTIVE STORY ( 1951 )

FESTIVAL TRIBUTES

Chinese Multiplex House 6

A masterpiece of compression, this taut stage adaptation manages to cover 24 hours in a police station in just over 100 minutes. The tightness contributes to a tragic atmosphere as tough detective Kirk Douglas finds his unbending devotion to law and order tested by revelations about wife Eleanor Parker’s criminal past. Their powerful story is complemented by strong supporting work by the likes of William Bendix, Gladys George, George Macready and four members of the original Broadway cast: Horace McMahon, Joseph Wiseman, Michael Strong and Lee Grant. In her film debut as a shoplifter, Grant truly lives the part by stealing every scene she’s in, earning an Oscar nomination and a Best Actress Award from the Cannes Film Festival. Director William Wyler rehearsed the cast for two weeks and had Douglas prepare by playing the role on stage in Phoenix and hanging around a New York City police station. Even though Wyler and cameraman Lee Garmes used his customary deep focus photography to capture all the action, he completed the film ahead of schedule and under budget, a rarity for a director known for taking his time. (d. William Wyler, 103m, DCP)

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ENTERTAINMENT MEMORABILIA EXHIBIT AND APPRAISALS FROM BONHAMS

Lobby at The Hollywood Roosevelt HotelLobby

The TCM Classic Film Festival is proud to partner once again with the world-renowned Bonhams auction house to provide expert appraisals of classic movie memorabilia for Festival goers. Come and watch as the experts at Bonhams help your fellow attendees learn more about their silver screen collectibles. Through these clinics, Bonhams’ experts have discovered many important items that have gone on to bring record prices at auction. Appraisal slots, with a two item maximum, are limited. Attendees interested in having their memorabilia appraised can get more details by visiting http://bonhams.com/tcm, or by emailing caren.roberts@bonhams.com or by calling 323-436-5409. Note: Attendance to this appraisal event is open to the public. Standby walk up appraisals may be considered, time permitting.

BACKLOT TRIVIA TOURNAMENT ROUND 3 BACKLOT TRIVIA

Roosevelt Lobby at The Hollywood Roosevelt HotelRoosevelt Lobby

Who knows the most movie trivia?  TCM Backlot members face off against each other for the chance to play in the Final Round against a team of TCM staffers!  

BACKLOT TRIVIA TOURNAMENT FINAL ROUND BACKLOT TRIVIA

Roosevelt Lobby at The Hollywood Roosevelt HotelRoosevelt Lobby

Who knows the most movie trivia?  TCM Backlot members face off against each other for the chance to play in the Final Round against a team of TCM staffers!