Schedule **Schedule is subject to change

THE ART OF SUBTITLING

Club TCM at The Hollywood Roosevelt

An important part of film restoration today is the one most overlooked: the subtitles.  First used in the early 1930s, superimposed titles were first added sparsely to foreign films, with the belief being that people didn’t want to read at the movies. In recent years, new technology has helped make them sharper than ever. The best subtitles, though, are those the audience doesn’t notice. Bruce Goldstein, who has written and edited subtitles for over 30 classics released by his company, Rialto Pictures, presents this entertaining history of the process, and will give an insider’s look at creating subtitles for movies like Panique (1946), Grand Illusion (1937) and Godzilla (1954).

A CONVERSATION WITH LEE GRANT

Club TCM at The Hollywood Roosevelt

The multi-talented actress and director Lee Grant will discuss her fascinating life and career in this one-hour conversation. Grant made her film debut opposite Kirk Douglas in Detective Story (1951), which earned her an Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actress, but her promising film career was cut short when she was blacklisted for not testifying against her then husband, Arnold Manoff.  Grant continued acting on television throughout the 1950s and returned to films in the late 1960s, appearing in such works as In the Heat of the Night (1967) and The Landlord (1970). During the 1970s, Grant transitioned into directing, creating an impressive body of work, most recently the Kirk and Michael Douglas documentary …A Father…A Son…Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (2005).

HOLLYWOOD HOME MOVIES HOLLYWOOD HOME MOVIES

Club TCM at The Hollywood Roosevelt

The Academy Film Archive shares gems from its collection with specially-selected home movies from Hollywood’s Golden Age including a homemade comedy by the Alfred Hitchcock family; making The Adventures of Robin Hood; a live broadcast of Al Jolson’s radio show; the 1938 Leading Men vs. Comedians baseball game; behind the scenes with Gypsy Rose Lee, Billie Burke, Oliver Hardy, Loretta Young, Celeste Holm, Betty Grable, James Stewart and more.  Enjoy unique, rarely-screened footage with special guests. Presented by Randy Haberkamp, Managing Director of Preservation and Foundation Programs for AMPAS, and Lynne Kirste, Special Collections Curator at the Archive.

THE COURT JESTER ( 1955 )

MOVIE SPOOFS

TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX

Although it is now considered Danny Kaye’s best film, THE COURT JESTER originally lost money at the box office and received only tepid reviews. Repeated television screenings, however, have made it a favorite among his fans who relish its lavish re-creation of medieval times and Kaye’s comic bravado in scenes where he switches from heroic knight to cowardly jester at the snap of a finger. The famed scene in which Mildred Natwick cautions him that “the pellet with the poison’s in the vessel with the pestle” has become a classic. Kaye and the writing-directing team of Melvin Frank and Norman Panama were looking to re-create the manic comic inventiveness of his stage and nightclub work on film. With this tale of a troubadour masquerading as a jester to save an infant king from usurpers, he got his wish. He also got to work with an impressive cast, including Glynis Johns as his love interest, Angela Lansbury as her rival and Basil Rathbone as the villain. The medieval rebirth drove the budget up toward $4 million, the highest for a comedy at that time. But it also gives the film a fairy tale quality that perfectly fits Kaye’s frenzied comic style and will be showcased to great effect with this world premiere restoration. (d. Melvin Frank, Norman Panama, 101m, DCP)

THE AWFUL TRUTH ( 1937 )

DIVORCE/REMORSE

TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX

Divorce on screen has never been the same since Cary Grant and Irene Dunne played an estranged couple fighting for custody of each other’s hearts in this screwball classic shown in this world premiere restoration. At first brought together over custody of their dog (played by the same dog who was Asta in 1934’s The Thin Man), they keep butting into each other’s new romances for a series of inspired improvisation. “Improvisation” was the word on the set, as director Leo McCarey tossed out the script and encouraged his actors to invent their scenes. When Ralph Bellamy, as one of Dunne’s suitors, admitted he couldn’t sing, McCarey asked him to try, filmed it and put it in the picture. Grant hated working that way and begged to be replaced, but he ended up re-branding himself as the screen’s top sophisticated comedian. It’s hard to tell which scene is funnier: Dunne running into Grant’s stripper girlfriend, Grant crashing Dunne’s classical vocal concert, Dunne pretending to be Grant’s low-brow sister or any of the other comic gems. McCarey won the Oscar for Best Director, while Dunne, Bellamy, the picture, the script and the editing all scored nominations. (d. Leo McCarey, 91m, DCP)

THE JERK ( 1979 )

FESTIVAL TRIBUTES

TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX

Steve Martin made the transition from top stand-up comic to movie star with this picaresque tale of a fool who rises to wealth and prominence only to lose it all. Along the way, he has slapstick jobs as a gas station attendance and a weight guesser, a marriage to the beautiful Bernadette Peters and has encounters with a female biker and a deranged killer. The jokes are fast and furious, starting with the opening in which he learns that his African-American parents adopted him. That was the script’s inspiration, bouncing off one of his stand-up routines about being “born a poor black child.” Martin’s desire to enter into films grew, and when a studio offered him a two picture deal he asked Carl Gottlieb to collaborate. They wrote the story together, and the final screenplay for the film was then co-written by Martin Gottlieb and Michael Elias. Although the picture received mixed reviews and even scored a Razzie nomination, it was a huge hit-making more than $100 million on a mere $4 million investment. It remains a favorite among comedy fans and led to three more collaborations with Reiner, including Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid (1982). (d. Carl Reiner, 94m, DCP) Note: This screening will be preceded by book signing and conversation with Carl Reiner in this venue. 

SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER ( 1977 )

ESSENTIALS

TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX

From the first shots of John Travolta strutting down the streets of Brooklyn, audiences knew they were watching the birth of a star. The role of Tony Manero, who works in a dead-end job but releases his frustrations dancing at the local disco, embodies a theme that has resonated through American history. Tony dreams of breaking free from his perceived lot in life to enter a new world, which for him is the glittering spires of Manhattan across the Verrazzano Narrows Bridge. With that dream, set to the Bee Gees disco score (the top selling album to that time), the film became a huge hit and launched Travolta’s film career. It wasn’t the only career the film kicked off. Forty percent of the cast were making their movie debuts, including Fran Drescher, Adrienne King and Donna Pescow, who’s particularly great as Tony’s first dance partner. Travolta was already a rising star before making the picture thanks to his hit series Welcome Back, Kotter. Street scenes had to be shot at the crack of dawn to escape crowds of shrieking fans. The film brought Travolta even more fans, along with an Oscar nomination. (d. John Badham, 118m, DCP)

THE GRADUATE ( 1967 )

ESSENTIALS

TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX

The country’s generation gap came to the screen in 1967, largely thanks to this combination coming-of-age story, screwball comedy and romantic melodrama shown here in a world premiere restoration. College graduate Benjamin Braddock’s (Dustin Hoffman) struggle to find himself leads to an affair with a married woman (Anne Bancroft) and the possibility of true love with her daughter (Katharine Ross). Their scenes play out with an almost improvisational feel as Mike Nichols borrows tricks from the New Wave playbook to capture Benjamin’s sense of unease at returning to his materialistic roots in Pasadena. One of the film’s triumphs was its casting. After considering traditional movie star types like Robert Redford and Warren Beatty, Nichols cast Hoffman, an actor so far from the conventional leading man mold that when he showed up to audition producer Joseph E. Levine thought he was a messenger boy. Hoffman ushered in a new era of leading players who looked and acted like real people. The film also benefited from a soundtrack of Simon and Garfunkel tunes that came about by accident. Nichols was editing to their music when he decided to use the songs in the picture. (d. Mike Nichols, 106m, DCP)

RED RIVER ( 1948 )

ESSENTIALS

Egyptian Theatre

With this Western, director Howard Hawks propelled the genre into a new future where character shadings were as important as action. The story about a Texas cattleman (John Wayne) and his adoptive son (Montgomery Clift) clashing during the cattle drive that opens up the Chisholm Trail was nothing new. Borden Chase, who had written the original story and collaborated on the screenplay, said it was really Mutiny on the Bounty (1935) with cowboys instead of sailors, but in Hawks’ hands it turned into a mythic tale of generational conflict. The film’s epic scope drove the budget up particularly when Hawks had to adjust the script and shooting schedule to accommodate unexpected rain on the Arizona locations. The film’s box-office success more than made up for it however. RED RIVER not only brought John Wayne new respect as an actor for his multi-leveled performance but also made Clift a star. It was the first film he shot, though post-production delays kept it off the screen until his second film, The Search (1948), could open. (d. Howard Hawks, 133m, 35mm)

REAR WINDOW ( 1954 )

ESSENTIALS

Egyptian Theatre

This film could be subtitled “On the Art of Watching a Movie,” as Alfred Hitchcock explores the voyeuristic nature of film going. Confined to his apartment, photo journalist James Stewart passes the time by using his telephoto lens to spy on the people in the buildings across the courtyard, and the audience spies right along with him. Before long, he’s uncovered a murder that prompts him to take action. The isolated act of watching opens the door for Stewart to become more involved in the world as he tries to participate in the stolen lives he spies on. When girlfriend Grace Kelly breaks into killer Raymond Burr’s apartment to look for clues, the act of watching her forces Stewart to accept his growing love for her. One of the most accessible of great film directors, Hitchcock consistently worked with witty screenwriters like John Michael Hayes and strong actors like Stewart, Kelly and Thelma Ritter who make his suspenseful morality plays go down easily. He also was the master of the in joke, as when he made up Burr to look like former boss David O. Sleznick. (d. Alfred Hitchcock, 112m, DCP)

THE UNDERWORLD STORY ( 1950 )

DISCOVERIES

Egyptian Theatre

This unjustly neglected film noir beat Billy Wilder’s Ace in the Hole (1951) to the screen by a year, with its tale of a corrupt reporter (Dan Duryea) manipulating a small-town story for his own benefit. He’s a disgraced reporter exiled to Gale Storm’s New England paper in time to cover the case of an African-American maid unfairly charged with killing her socialite boss. The reporter could care less about justice, instead his focus is on the headlines and the chance to cash in on the woman’s defense fund. His cynicism stems from his disgraceful time as a big city reporter, where a shrewd mobster set him up to be blackballed by his colleagues. He jumps back into a firestorm of community politics that reflected the country’s mood during the anti-Communist witch hunts. The film’s liberal politics attracted the attention of the House Un-American Activities Committee. Director Cy Endfield fled to England when he was called to testify, while actor Howard Da Silva (as the big city mob boss) and screenwriter Henry Blankfort refused to name names and were blacklisted. This newly struck 35mm print is courtesy of the Film Noir Foundation Collection at UCLA Film & Television Archive. (d. Cy Endfield, 91m, 35mm)

THEODORA GOES WILD ( 1936 )

DISCOVERIES

Egyptian Theatre

When Irene Dunne made this screwball comedy in 1936, it was a leap of faith for her and her studio, Columbia. Until then, she was known primarily as a dramatic diva with a few forays into musical comedy. With the rest of Hollywood leaping on the screwball bandwagon, however, and first choices Marion Davies and Carole Lombard unavailable, the studio insisted Dunne start her new contract there with this sparkling script. She stars as a small town church organist who has secretly written a bestselling scandalous novel. When her illustrator (Melvyn Douglas) discovers her true identity, he sets out to seduce her, only to flee at the thought of true love. Her efforts to win his heart, over the objections of her blue-nosed neighbors and his crooked politician father, stand as one of the best expressions of the liberating spirit of screwball comedy. The film was a big hit and brought Dunne an Oscar nomination, but oddly has never been remade (Doris Day considered a musical version in the late 1950s). Columbia reused the dialogue, however, in Bedtime Story (1941) as the play Fredric March writes for actress wife Loretta Young. (d. Richard Boleslawski, 94m, 35mm)

BLACK NARCISSUS ( 1947 )

NITRATE

Egyptian Theatre

With some of the most beautiful cinematography in film history, this British classic demands to be seen on the big screen. Jack Cardiff modeled his work after the Dutch master Johannes Vermeer by photographing rich colors in simple lighting sources that almost make them glow. Writer-director duo Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger used this to capture the psychological tensions in this tale of a group of white-clad nuns attempting to open a convent school in the Himalayas. As they fight to maintain their vows of chastity, they are assaulted by the rich, sensuous world they have invaded. Deborah Kerr, as the young mother superior, won the New York Film Critics Award for her subtle, psychological performance, and was more than matched by Flora Robson as one of the more self-sacrificing sisters, David Farrar as the worldly estate manager and Kathleen Bryon as a troubled nun on the brink of madness. Contemporary audiences may balk at Jean Simmons’ casting as an Indian serving girl, but the film’s influence is undeniable. Martin Scorsese modeled the close ups in this film in his 1986 sports drama The Color of Money (1986), while the art direction in Frozen (2013) found inspiration in Powell and Pressburger’s snowy landscapes. Nitrate projection made possible through support of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, Turner Class Movies, and The Film Foundation in partnership with the American Cinematheque and the Academy Film Archive (d. Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger, 100m, nitrate)

THE CHINA SYNDROME ( 1979 )

FESTIVAL TRIBUTES

Chinese Multiplex House 1

When Michael Douglas was producing and starring in this thriller about a possible meltdown at a nuclear power plant, nobody could have predicted that two weeks after the film’s release there would be a nuclear accident at the Three Mile Island plant in Pennsylvania. Lines such as the one suggesting that such an event would render “an area of the size of Pennsylvania” uninhabitable—originally intended to make the film’s science more understandable and increase the suspense—suddenly became prophetic. Douglas plays the cameraman for reporter Jane Fonda who are both present during an emergency shutdown at a California plant. The event leads supervisor Jack Lemmon to uncover shortcuts in the construction that could trigger “The China Syndrome,” a major meltdown, and he turns to Fonda and Douglas to help publicize the cover-up. On the film’s initial release, nuclear power executives had derided its science, but the Three Mile Island accident lent it more credibility. Douglas also decided to forego a background score for the film, relying solely on music from on-screen sources, a decision that lent the film an even more realistic feel. DCP Courtesy of Sony Pictures. (d. James Bridges, 122m)

THE LAST PICTURE SHOW ( 1971 )

FESTIVAL TRIBUTES

Chinese Multiplex House 1

Peter Bogdanovich burst on the screen with this elegy to small-town Western life based on Larry McMurtry’s novel. Bogdanovich wasn’t exactly an overnight sensation. He had already directed two documentaries on movies and the cult classic Targets (1968). But this was the picture that made his name as one of Hollywood’s hottest young directors. The film critic turned director included clips from some of his favorite films—Father of the Bride (1950) and RED RIVER (1948)—and shot the film very much in the style of one of his idols, John Ford. He even featured one of Ford’s stock company actors, Ben Johnson, in an Oscar-winning performance as the town’s moral compass. Johnson is one of the highlights of a strong ensemble including fellow Oscar-winner Cloris Leachman, Jeff Bridges, Ellen Burstyn, Timothy Bottoms, Eileen Brennan and, in their film debuts, Cybill Shepherd, Randy Quaid and Sam Bottoms. Bogdanovich filmed in McMurtry’s hometown, Archer, TX, and, to capture the sense of fading glory, had veteran cinematographer Bruce Surtees shoot in black and white. As a result, for all its bleakness, the film reads as a love letter to the past and will be shown here in a special screening of the director’s cut version of the film. (d. Peter Bogdanovich, 118m, DCP)

BYE BYE BIRDIE ( 1963 )

ESSENTIALS

Chinese Multiplex House 1

Contrary to George S. Kaufman’s famous dictum, satire doesn’t always close on Saturday night. On stage and screen, BYE BYE BIRDIE presented a goofy and surprisingly graceful take on early 1960s American culture, skewering small-town life, child-rearing and most notably, Elvis Presley with its tale of the furor that erupts when teen favorite Conrad Birdie is drafted. With George Sidney, the MGM veteran of such classic musicals as The Harvey Girls (1946) and Kiss Me Kate (1953), directing, the film excels in big numbers, like Birdie’s (Jesse Pearson) hip-popping “Honestly Sincere.” Although Dick Van Dyke, as Birdie’s manager, and Paul Lynde, as the father of his biggest fan, repeated their roles from the Broadway production, the film’s focus shifted from the adults to the teens, with the lion’s share going to Ann-Margret as Lynde’s daughter, the recipient of Birdie’s final pre-military kiss. Sidney had been impressed by Ann-Margret’s Vegas act and built up her part, even adding a title song she performs seductively at the film’s beginning and end. The picture made her a major star, paving the way for her reunion with Sidney as the real Elvis’ leading lady in Viva Las Vegas (1964). (d. George Sidney, 112m)

BEST IN SHOW ( 2000 )

ESSENTIALS

Chinese Multiplex House 1

Pop culture is lovingly skewered in the films of Christopher Guest. After tackling the worlds of rock ‘n’ roll in This Is Spinal Tap (1984) and community theater in Waiting for Guffman (1996), he took on kennel clubs and dog shows with his customary glee in this 2000 mockumentary. Like other competition-centered documentaries, most notably Pumping Iron (1977), the film follows five competitors, in this case dog owners preparing for the Westminster Dog Show. One of the chief jokes is the way the owners resemble their dogs, including a bouncy middle-class couple (Eugene Levy and Catherine O’Hara), with their Norwich Terrier, and long-faced Guest with his bloodhound and overbred trophy wife Jennifer Coolidge and her poodle. After a year of research on dog shows, he and Levy created a 16-page outline around which his cast improvised. He then shot more than 60 hours of footage on 16mm handheld cameras. That was edited down to 90 minutes and blown up to 35mm. Many in the cast—including O’Hara, Levy, Fred Willard, Michael McKean, Bob Balaban and Parker Posey—had worked with him before, while Coolidge and Jane Lynch became welcome additions to his stock company with this film. (d. Christopher Guest, 90m, Digital)

TOP SECRET! ( 1984 )

MOVIE SPOOFS

Chinese Multiplex House 1

Elvis Presley fights Nazis—sort of—in this mash-up of rock ‘n’ roll musicals and World War II spy pictures. After completing Airplane! (1980), David Zucker, Jim Abrahams and Jerry Zucker were looking for a follow-up. They had been working on a take-off on wartime espionage films, but didn’t want to do a period picture. Then they came up with the idea of getting an Elvis-like singer mixed up with resistance fighters and enemy agents in East Germany. The setting was contemporary, but the plot conventions were pure 1940s, complete with torture sessions, daredevil escapes and a turncoat among the good guys. The writers had spotted Val Kilmer in a stage production and invited him to audition. When he showed up dressed as Elvis, complete with pompadour, they cast him, even though he had no experience singing or dancing. Kilmer worked so hard on the numbers he was able to do them himself, including a sizzling rendition of “Tutti Frutti.” Unlike Airplane!, TOP SECRET! has only two celebrity cameos, but they score, with Omar Sharif as a British agent and Peter Cushing, in his last American film, as a Swedish bookshop owner. (d. Jim Abrahams, David Zucker, Jerry Zucker, 90m, DCP)

THE KENTUCKY FRIED MOVIE ( 1977 )

MOVIE SPOOFS

Chinese Multiplex House 1

From the opening newscast warning viewers not to eat their popcorn to the final credits played over the world’s worst rendition of the “Carioca,” this series of comic sketches revels in inspired lunacy. Released when studio executives claimed sketch films couldn’t make money, the film’s success established writers Jim Abrahams and David and Jerry Zucker as three of the screen’s funniest filmmakers and helped director John Landis land his first big job directing National Lampoon’s Animal House (1978). Many of the film parodies, fake newscasts and commercials in the film came from material the writers had developed with their improvisational troupe, Kentucky Fried Theatre. When no studio would back the film, they made a demo reel that convinced Landis to direct the film and got a group of film exhibitors to invest $650,000. It brought in $7.1 million at the box office. The picture spoofs everything from disaster films (“That’s Armageddon”) to martial-arts pictures (“A Fistful of Yen”). Along with family members and relatively unknown actors from the improv world, the picture features cameos by Donald Sutherland, George Lazenby, Bill Bixby and Tony Dow, re-creating his role from Leave It to Beaver. (d. John Landis, 83m, digital)

ARSENIC AND OLD LACE ( 1944 )

DARK COMEDY

Chinese Multiplex House 4

Seventy-five years ago, Warner Bros. previewed one of its funniest films ever and then had to keep it out of circulation for two more years. Joseph Kesselring’s play about two sweet old ladies with the bad habit of poisoning lonely men was such a success the studio paid $175,000 for the screen rights. They also had to agree not to release the film until the Broadway production closed, which didn’t happen until 1944. The delay didn’t hurt business. The film was a huge success, though often overshadowed by director Frank Capra’s more thoughtful comedies and star Cary Grant’s more sophisticated films. Josephine Hull and Jean Adair repeated their stage performances as the murderous old darlings, along with John Alexander as the nephew who thinks he’s Teddy Roosevelt. When it came to casting the play’s top-billed star, Boris Karloff, as their criminal nephew, the producers balked. Warner Bros. even offered to let Humphrey Bogart take the stage role, but negotiations fell through. Instead Raymond Massey endured four hours a day in the makeup chair to play a character transformed by bad plastic surgery to look like Karloff’s Frankenstein’s monster. Peter Lorre, Jack Carson, Edward Everett Horton and Priscilla Lane co-star. (d. Frank Capra, 118m, 35mm)

DAVID AND LISA ( 1962 )

DISCOVERIES

Chinese Multiplex House 4

Perhaps, Frank Perry is best known today as the director of Mommie Dearest (1981). In the early ‘60s, however, he was one of a group of acclaimed independent film directors based in New York. With John Cassavetes and Shirley Clarke, he showed that you didn’t need big budgets and box office stars to make a great film. DAVID AND LISA, the debut feature for Perry and his writer wife Eleanor, got made for $200,000 but took off at the box office earning a more than 1,000 percent profit for its investors. It also created its own stars, with Keir Dullea, in only his second film, and Janet Margolin, in her film debut, as a pair of emotionally disturbed teenagers who help each other. Dullea suffers from a fear of being touched, but begins to open up when he’s drawn to Lisa, a split personality who only speaks in rhymes. Although their cure through love seems a little pat by contemporary standards, the filmmaking is still surprisingly accomplished. The Perrys received Oscar nominations and went on to such acclaimed projects as The Swimmer (1968), Diary of a Mad Housewife (1970) and the TV adaptation of Truman Capote’s The Thanksgiving Visitor (1967). (d. Frank Perry, 95m, 35mm)

AMERICA AMERICA ( 1963 )

DISCOVERIES

Chinese Multiplex House 4

Elia Kazan turned to his own family’s past for this intimate epic about a young man who dreams of finding freedom in the U.S. Inspired by stories of his uncle’s turn-of-the-century emigration, he focuses on Stavros (Stathis Giallelis), a member of Turkey’s oppressed Greek minority. Sent to help revive the family’s carpet business in Istanbul, he dreams instead of moving to a new land. Eschewing big names, Kazan cast unknowns like Greek actor Giallelis and New York stage actors who deliver indelible supporting performances. Among them were African-American actress Estelle Hemsley as Stavros’ stern grandmother, John Marley as a labor organizer, Lou Antonio as a con artist, Gregory Rozakis as a saintly friend, Katharine Balfour as a lonely middle-class wife and, perhaps best of all, Linda Marsh as a shy young woman the family wants Stavros to marry. Kazan shot extensively on locations in Turkey and Greece, capturing some stunning black-and-white images with cinematographer Haskell Wexler. Some were almost lost when the Turkish government decided the film was too critical and tried to confiscate the footage shot there. Fortunately, someone though to switch the labels on the film cans, allowing the Turkish shot scenes to leave the country. Preservation funding provided by Warner Bros. in association with The Film Foundation and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. (d. Elia Kazan, 174m)

STREET SCENE ( 1931 )

DISCOVERIES

Chinese Multiplex House 4

Producer Samuel Goldwyn went for prestige when he filmed Elmer Rice’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play in 1931 and it paid off. It helped greatly that he made King Vidor director, as Vidor was an expert at dealing with social issues. Early on, Vidor opted not to open up the story set in front of a block of apartment buildings. Instead, he worked with cinematographer George Barnes to use creative camera work to keep the picture moving. Set on one day on a New York street during which a man kills his cheating wife and her lover, he never used the same camera setup twice. Goldwyn imported several actors from the New York cast, including Beulah Bondi and John Qualen, in their movie debuts. He also borrowed Sylvia Sidney from Paramount to play the young woman who loses her parents in a single act of violence. The role made her a major star. Vidor brought in Broadway composer and conductor Alfred Newman to write the music, his first full film score. Newman’s main theme became one of the the definitive depictions of New York City life, used in dozens of later films. The print is preserved at the UCLA Film & Television Archive with funding provided by the AFI/NEA. (d. King Vidor, 80m, DCP)

UNFAITHFULLY YOURS ( 1948 )

DARK COMEDY

Chinese Multiplex House 4

In his sole film with writer-director Preston Sturges, Rex Harrison demonstrates his facility with light comedy, a surprising knack for slapstick and the magnetism that won him the nickname “Sexy Rexy.” Realizing that music playing on the radio was influencing the way he wrote, Sturges created the story of a pathologically jealous symphony conductor (Rex Harrison) who fantasizes three ways of dealing with wife Linda Darnell’s imagined infidelity scored to each of the three pieces he’s rehearsing. His big mistake, after assuming his doting wife is cheating, is trying to turn the fantasies into reality, leading to a riotous finale. It took Sturges 16 years to get the script on film, and even then its black comic approach was too far ahead of its time to prosper at the box office. As in all his films, Sturges fills the script with fast-paced, literate dialogue that engages the intellect of the audience. He always got the best out of his leading ladies, and in this film, Darnell is at her most alluring. He also used members of his unofficial stock company to very good effect, particularly Rudy Vallee as Harrison’s flustered brother-in-law and Edgar Kennedy as a detective in love with classical music. (d. Preston Sturges, 105m, 35mm)

STALAG 17 ( 1953 )

ESSENTIALS

Chinese Multiplex House 6

With its bitter humor, cynical loner hero and confined setting, this POW drama was a new kind of war film. It was so different, in fact that Paramount Pictures kept it on the shelf for a year, not sending it out until the release of American POWs from the Korean War in 1953 gave it a timely edge. Star William Holden had to be forced to take the role as the camp con artist suspected of being an informant and through the first phase of shooting, he fought vainly to have the character softened. Director and co-writer Billy Wilder, however, knew what he was doing. He used creative camera placement and crowd staging to keep the action moving even though most of the scenes were shot in the prisoners’ barracks. He also isolated Holden’s character until the end, playing on the actor’s all-American image to make it the story of an underdog in need of vindication. The result was a box-office winner that made Holden a major star and brought him the Oscar for Best Actor. Wilder’s other casting coup was getting director Otto Preminger to play the camp commandant, a subtle joke on Preminger’s reputation as an on-set tyrant. (d. Billy Wilder, 120m, DCP)

THE GREAT DICTATOR ( 1940 )

ESSENTIALS

Chinese Multiplex House 6

While the rest of Hollywood mostly ignored the spreading war in Europe or depicted the struggle against fascism allegorically (as in the 1940 The Sea Hawk), Charles Chaplin held the Fuehrer up to ridicule. His inspiration was Leni Riefenstahl’s documentary about the Nuremberg rallies, Triumph of the Will (1935). He studied the rally’s staging and used Hitler’s speech in the film to develop his characterization of Adenoid Hynkel, leader of the fictional Tomania. He also plays a Jewish barber who resembles the dictator (many pundits had pointed out Chaplin’s resemblance to Hitler) and briefly takes his place. This was Chaplin’s first true sound film, though he had experimented with sound effects in Modern Times (1936). He didn’t let talking get in the way of his genius at crafting sight gags, however. Highlights include a spirited shaving routine for the barber, a battle for dominance between Hynkel and fellow dictator Napalini (Jack Oakie), and Hynkel’s inspired dance with a globe, a graceful metaphor for Hitler’s dreams of global domination. Though there were critics who suggested Hitler’s rise was too threatening for comedy, audiences in the U.S., England and post-war France embraced the film, making it Chaplin’s biggest financial success. Preceded by the short film "You Nazty Spy!" (d. Charles Chaplin, 125m, DCP)

WAY OUT WEST ( 1937 )

MOVIE SPOOFS

Chinese Multiplex House 6

Although it met with mixed reviews on its initial release, this Western satire is now regarded as one of the best to star Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy and was one of their favorites. The simple plot, in which they try to get the deed to a prosperous mine to its rightful owner, provides an excuse for a series of running gags and some of the team’s best musical numbers. Their surprisingly nimble soft shoe routine in front of a saloon to “At the Ball” has become one of their most frequently excerpted routines. Their rendition of “Trail of the Lonesome Pine” topped the British charts when reissued in 1975. In between musical numbers, they engage in a series of comic shoot-outs, jokes about horseback riding and a few encounters with a seductive saloon hall girl. The film also benefits from a great villainous turn by James Finlayson, a master of the double take, as the evil saloon owner out to snare the deed. Finlayson was a frequent foil to the team, most notably as the man whose home they demolish in the classic short “Big Business” (1929). (d. James W. Horne, 64m) This screening will include the Laurel and Hardy short film “The Music Box” (1932) where the two play moving men asked to deliver a piano. Add a steep staircase, and you get one of the most iconic comedic sequences in film.

KING OF HEARTS ( 1966 )

DISCOVERIES

Chinese Multiplex House 6

One of the triumphs of the repertory cinema movement returns to the screen in this North American premiere restored print supervised by the film’s cinematographer, Pierre Lhomme. When it first appeared in 1966, Philippe de Broca’s comic anti-war fable was too much a departure for his earlier satirical adventures like That Man from Rio (1964) to score with critics or at the box office. In 1970, however, it began turning up in repertory cinemas and at midnight screenings where its tale of a World War I Scottish soldier (Alan Bates) who discovers a French small town taken over by inmates from the local insane asylum struck a chord with audiences rebelling against conformity and the Vietnam War (it even played at one Massachusetts theater for five years). Since then, the film has won praise for its juxtaposition of mental illness with the insanity of war and its international cast, which included Bates, Pierre Brasseur, Jean-Claude Brialy, Micheline Presle, Michel Serrault and then newcomer Geneviève Bujold. The director even has a cameo as a young Adolf Hitler. The film has been quoted in such diverse films as Stephen Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan (1998) and the animated hit WALL-E (2008), while Noah Baumbach’s Frances Ha (2012) recycles Georges Delerue’s charming score. (d. Philippe de Broca, 102m, DCP)

THE INCIDENT ( 1967 )

DISCOVERIES

Chinese Multiplex House 6

This taut independent film about hoodlums terrifying the passengers on a late-night subway ride was so upsetting that the New York Transit Authority denied the crew permission to film on its property (they shot slyly on location). Nor has it ever been given a theatrical release in England, where it was banned in the late 1960s. Although Nicholas E. Baehr’s original teleplay first appeared on the DuPont Show of the Week in 1963, a year before the notorious killing of Kitty Genovese, as residents of a nearby apartment building listened on apathetically, it seems to capture the same spirit. As the two thugs (an electric Tony Musante and Martin Sheen in his screen debut) systematically humiliate and threaten the various passengers, the others look on doing nothing. The one couple who could leave, played by Brock Peters and Ruby Dee, stay because Peters enjoys seeing the white people abused. The cast, drawn largely from the worlds of New York theater and broadcasting, is a high-powered assemblage including Jack Gilford, Thelma Ritter, Jan Sterling, Gary Merrill, Beau Bridges and a very young Donna Mills. Under Larry Peerce’s direction, they keep the almost one-set movie from seeming static. (d. Larry Peerce, 107m)

PLANET OF THE APES ( 1968 )

ESSENTIALS

Poolside at The Hollywood Roosevelt HotelPoolside

Despite its depiction of a dystopian future in which simians have replaced humans, this pioneering science fiction film became a hit as much for its almost irresistible sense of humor as for its bleak message and innovative makeup. Pierre Boulle’s original novel was written as a satire, though early screenplay drafts took a more serious approach. It took an uncredited re-write by John T. Kelley and some inspired on-set improvisations by director Franklin J. Schaffner to turn the film into a tense yet witty take on race relations. Charlton Heston stars as a human astronaut who crashes on a mysterious planet ruled by gorillas, orangutans and chimpanzees. The apes come to life thanks to a gifted cast—including Roddy McDowall, Kim Hunter and Maurice Evans—and John Chambers’ clever makeup designs, which won a honorary Oscar. Planet of the Apes hit theaters a week before the Martin Luther King, Jr. assassination, becoming a box-office hit by offering an allegory for race relations as the subject was ruling the airwaves. It went on to inspire four sequels, live-action and animated TV series, comic books and a slew of merchandise. Tim Burton revived the series with a 2001 remake. (d. Franklin J. Schaffner, 102m, Digital)

THIS IS CINERAMA ( 1952 )

SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS

ArcLight Cinemas’ Cinerama Dome

It isn’t just a movie; it’s an adventure! One way Hollywood dealt with competition from television was to make movies bigger. Cinerama, with its 2.65:1 screen ratio shown by three synchronized projectors, was as big as it got. Although too bulky for mass production (there were only eight true Cinerama films made), the process packed them in. This first film in Cinerama only showed in 14 theatres around the nation, yet it still became the top-grossing film of its year. Narrator Lowell Thomas sets the stage in the first few moments. After reviewing the history of the visual arts in a black and white sequence shot in the standard academy format, he announces “This is Cinerama!” The image expands and switches to color as viewers are taken on a roller coaster ride so vivid many claimed they could feel the wind. What follows is a series of thrilling vistas—a performance at La Scala, a gondola ride through Venice, a water-skiing show from Cypress Gardens—culminating with a 24-minute aerial trip from sea to shining sea shot from the nose of a modified B52. Rarely seen today, the film will screen in its original format. (d. Merian C. Cooper, Gunther von Fritsch, Ernest B. Schoedsack, Michael Todd, Jr., 115m)

LIVE FROM THE TCM CLASSIC FILM FESTIVAL: MICHAEL DOUGLAS

The Montalbán Theatre

Passholder exclusive event!  Academy Award and Golden Globe winning actor and producer Michael Douglas will discuss his legendary life and career during this special interview. Attendees are strongly encouraged to arrive early and should plan on staying for the full two-hour program, due to the fact that this event will be taped to air on TCM.  NOTE: Passholders under the age of 18 must be accompanied by guardian.