Schedule **Schedule is subject to change

SO YOU THINK YOU KNOW MOVIES

Club TCM at The Hollywood Roosevelt

Bruce Goldstein, repertory program director of New York’s Film Forum, returns as host of his popular annual quiz, now a TCM Classic Film Festival tradition. Everyone - from casual movie buffs to fanatical film fans - are welcome to take part in this fun, often astounding team challenge, and you can join a team on the spot (minimum 2 team members, maximum 8).

WELCOME PARTY

Club TCM at The Hollywood Roosevelt

Join your fellow passholders as we kick off the 8th annual TCM Classic Film Festival.  Please refer to the back of your pass for entrance eligibility.

IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT ( 1967 )

ESSENTIALS

TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX

There was a new audience for movies about race in 1967 and this film captured its affections and respect. When a Chicago businessman is murdered in a sleepy Mississippi town, the first person picked up is a black man (Sidney Poitier) from out of town. He turns out to be a Philadelphia police detective and before long he’s schooling the local sheriff (Rod Steiger) in how to solve crimes the modern way, and teaching the local community leaders that this is one black man who won’t defer to their systemic racism. With great performances from Poitier and Steiger (who won the Oscar for Best Actor), a strong supporting cast including Lee Grant, taut editing from Oscar-winner Hal Ashby, groundbreaking cinematography by Haskell Wexler, a jazz score by Quincy Jones and Norman Jewison’s capable direction, the film was a box-office winner and the Academy’s Best Picture of the year. It also helped make Poitier the first black actor to become the nation’s number one box-office star and opened the screen to more positive treatments of racial diversity. (d. Norman Jewison, 109m, DCP)

LOVE CRAZY ( 1941 )

DIVORCE/REMORSE

Egyptian Theatre

By the time they made their tenth of 14 films together, William Powell and Myrna Loy didn’t have to play the perfect couple; they were the perfect couple. Even in a plot that has them learning the awful truth about divorce, they work together so seamlessly you never really expect them to break up. Critics have called this their zaniest film together. A series of misunderstandings fostered by Loy’s meddlesome mother (Florence Bates) and the presence of Powell’s old flame (Gail Patrick) almost leads to divorce. To keep their marriage intact, Powell has to feign madness and even dabbles in drag, shaving his famous mustache for the only time in his screen career. As an MGM film, the picture is impeccably designed and features a supporting cast filled with indelible character types. Bates was a genius at making obnoxious characters entertaining, and Patrick was appropriately glamorous (though never a real threat to Loy). Also on hand are Jack Carson, borrowed from Warner Bros., as a bumptious athlete who wants to help Loy pick up the pieces and dialect comic Sig Ruman as the head of an insane asylum. (d. Jack Conway, 99m, 35mm)

THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH ( 1934 )

NITRATE

Egyptian Theatre

Get a rare look at one of Alfred Hitchcock’s earliest films in its original form. Because its original copyright holders let if fall into the public domain, this suspense classic has mostly been screened in poorly edited, damaged prints. Hitchcock first came up with the story of an everyday couple whose child is kidnapped by anarchists while on his honeymoon with Alma Reville. After two flops in a row, he took it to a friend who had taken over Gaumont studios. The result put him back on top. What helped tremendously was the lighter-than-air quality he gave the otherwise grim story. The leads, Leslie Banks and Edna Best, share sophisticated banter throughout, while villain Peter Lorre seems like an overgrown child turning to evil because it’s fun. In his first English-language film, Lorre made a big impression, although he learned his lines phonetically. The film’s big set piece occurs in Albert Hall, where a noisy classical piece (in a film with no background score) will mask an assassination. Composer Bernard Herrmann liked Arthur Benjamin’s “Storm Cloud Cantata” so much that he used it in Hitchcock’s 1956 remake rather than write a new piece. Nitrate projection made possible through support of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, Turner Classic Movies, and The Film Foundation in partnership with the American Cinematheque and the Academy Film Archive. Print Courtesy of The George Eastman House. (d. Alfred Hitchcock, 75m, Nitrate)

REMEMBERING ROBERT

Chinese Multiplex House 1

TCM staff members and friends will share memories and stories about Robert Osborne, celebrating his life and love of classic films. All passholders and pass levels are invited to attend.  

SOME LIKE IT HOT ( 1959 )

ESSENTIALS

Chinese Multiplex House 1

Contradicting this film’s last line (one of the most famous of all time), in this picture “Everybody’s perfect.” Inspired by a 1935 French film, Billy Wilder and co-writer I.A.L. Diamond concocted an irresistibly funny story of two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) forced to dress as women after witnessing the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre. They join an all-women’s band, where they meet Marilyn Monroe, a challenge to any straight man’s attempt to hide his masculine urges. As funny as the picture is, it also has a heart. Monroe’s character is silly and charming and always on the verge of having her heart broken. Her three songs— the high-spirited “Runnin’ Wild,” the playful “I Wanna Be Loved by You” and the heartbreaking “I’m Through with Love”—are like a musical autobiography. They’re easily her best musical moments on screen. As Lemmon’s love interest, Joe E. Brown shows why he was one of the top comic stars of the early 1930s.  (d. Billy Wilder, 120m, DCP)

HAROLD AND MAUDE ( 1971 )

DARK COMEDY

Chinese Multiplex House 1

This offbeat comedy was a box-office dud when it premiered but took off on the midnight movie circuit often paired with KING OF HEARTS (1966). In retrospect, the critics who panned this winsome tale of a death-obsessed young man (Bud Cort) falling in love with a woman (Ruth Gordon) closing in on 80 years old now seem hopelessly out of touch. Coming out in 1971, as the youth movement that spawned it was fading, the film was too eccentric for mainstream audiences. Today, however, it is regarded as a classic romantic comedy, as cherished now for its eccentric black humor as it was derided 46 years ago. Colin Higgins had first written the script as his MFA thesis and then expanded it for feature production. Oscar-winning film editor Hal Ashby took the directing reigns and captured the script’s spirit with zoom shots and musical montages set to the songs of Cat Stevens. He also assembled the perfect cast, with Cort as the young innocent, Gordon establishing herself as the screen’s great eccentric octogenarian and Vivian Pickles, as Cort’s society mother, seeming to have wandered in from a Marx Brothers movie. (d. Hal Ashby, 91m)

JEZEBEL ( 1938 )

ESSENTIALS

Chinese Multiplex House 4

Bette Davis had gone on strike from Warner Bros. for better roles in 1936. Although the studio successfully sued to get her back to work, when she returned a year later they did indeed start finding better pictures for her, with this—her first big-budget historical feature—as the real capper. Just to sweeten the pot, they borrowed William Wyler to direct. The two turned this tale of a woman who shocks Southern society by wearing a red dress to a black-and-white ball into a romantic epic. Davis had always done impressive physical work on screen, but with Wyler directing her that physicality was more focused than ever. She turned the simple picking up of her skirt with her riding crop or kneeling to ask forgiveness into character-defining moments among the finest acting ever put on screen. Davis justifiably won her second Best Actress Oscar for the performance (with Fay Bainter, as her loving but judgmental aunt winning Best Supporting Actress) and started her rise to a top box-office position. The film was her second with Henry Fonda and also features George Brent as a rejected suitor. (d. William Wyler, 104m, 35mm)

REQUIEM FOR A HEAVYWEIGHT ( 1962 )

HEY, THAT'S NOT FUNNY

Chinese Multiplex House 4

Ads heralded this mordant view of the last professional days of a failed boxer as “The Gutsiest Picture Ever Made!” It may well have been as writer Rod Sterling and director Ralph Nelson created an even more critical view of the characters than in their acclaimed live television drama. In opening up their story of a boxer (Anthony Quinn) caught between a debt-ridden manager (Jackie Gleason) who needs him to keep fighting and an employment counselor (Julie Harris) who thinks she can build him a new life, they added more dimension to the characters. Gleason’s crooked manager was given a stronger case for keeping Quinn in the game while Harris was given ulterior motives for helping him, leading to complex, compelling drama. Quinn had been unable to do the TV version, which ended up starring Jack Palance. He made the film during a two-month hiatus while shooting Lawrence of Arabia (1962). Two months was more than enough time for him to create an indelible characterization, with scars making him almost unrecognizable and a wheezy voice modeled on one of the film’s fight coordinators, an ex-boxer who had taken one too many blows to the throat. (d. Ralph Nelson, 95m, 35mm)

DAWSON CITY: FROZEN TIME ( 2016 )

SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS

Chinese Multiplex House 6

One hundred sixty-three miles south of the Arctic Circle, film preservationists stumbled upon one of the greatest treasures in film history: a buried cache of 533 reels of nitrate film, consisting of 372 titles, a good deal of it still viewable thanks to its being encased in permafrost. The location, a swimming pool under a one-time hockey rink, had been used to dispose of the films shown in Dawson City, Yukon, Canada, between 1903 and 1929. Since Dawson was often the last stop for distribution, the films were never returned. Instead, they were stored in the basement of an abandoned library until 1929—when they were dumped into a former swimming pool that served as a landfill—where they remained inadvertently preserved in permafrost for 49 years. Their discovery in 1978 led to a massive recovery project. Documentarian Bill Morrison, known for his elegiac films about early cinema, has created a documentary combining contemporary footage about the discovery, still photos from Dawson City’s history and selections from the 500,000 feet of film deemed usable. Among them are early work by the likes of Lionel Barrymore, Lon Chaney, Pearl White, Douglas Fairbanks and Harold Lloyd, newsreel footage dating from 1917 to 1921 and, perhaps most surprising, footage of the 1919 World Series, in which gamblers bribed the Chicago White Sox to throw the games to the Cincinnati Reds. (d. Bill Morrison, 120m, DCP)

I’M ALL RIGHT JACK ( 1959 )

DISCOVERIES

Chinese Multiplex House 6

Unlike the genteel British comedies most people remember fondly, this satire fires wildly at all levels of society in a tale of failed relations between labor and management. A sequel to the Boulting Brothers’ military comedy Private’s Progress (1956), this film features many of the same actors, including Ian Carmichael as a high-born young innocent, Miles Malleson as his dithering father, Dennis Price as his greedy uncle, Richard Attenborough as an old friend turned businessman and Terry-Thomas as an army major moving into middle management. Joining them is Peter Sellers, who pretty much walks off with the film as an elderly Communist union head who squares off against management after Carmichael goes to work under his guidance. Their confrontations lead to a national strike as each side holds firmly to its own narrow priorities. Director John Boulting and his brother, producer Roy Boulting spent a good deal of the ‘50s satirizing British life with films like Private’s Progress (1956) and Man in a Cocked Hat (1959), but this was their most critical work yet. Although pushed out of the spotlight by even more bitter satires like DR. STRANGELOVE (1964), the Boulting films are ripe for rediscovery. (d. John Boulting, 105m, DCP)

FIRST-TIMERS MEET-UP

Library Bar at The Hollywood Roosevelt HotelLibrary Bar

Does this year mark your TCM Classic Film Festival debut? Join TCM Staff and fellow first-timers at this low-key gathering where you’ll learn the ins and outs of attending the Festival—from how the queue lines work to when to grab a bite to eat, and much more.  Note: Special Ribbons will be given out to those who attend; quantities are limited so get there early.

HITCHCOCK FANS MEET-UP

Library Bar at The Hollywood Roosevelt HotelLibrary Bar

Do you love the “Master of Suspense?” Then this meet-up is for you! Join Professor Richard Edwards of Ball State University and course instructor for TCM Presents Into the Darkness: Investigating Film Noir and TCM Presents Painfully Funny: Exploring Slapstick in the Movies, as he leads this informal discussion of Macguffins, Red Herrings, Icy Blondes and more! Note: Special Ribbons will be given out to those who attend, quantities are limited so get there early.

BACKLOT TRIVIA TOURNAMENT ROUND 1 BACKLOT TRIVIA

Roosevelt Lobby at The Hollywood Roosevelt HotelRoosevelt Lobby

Who knows the most movie trivia?  TCM Backlot members face off against each other for the chance to play in the Final Round against a team of TCM staffers!

BACKLOT TRIVIA TOURNAMENT ROUND 1 BACKLOT TRIVIA

Roosevelt Lobby at The Hollywood Roosevelt HotelRoosevelt Lobby

Who knows the most movie trivia?  TCM Backlot members face off against each other for the chance to play in the Final Round against a team of TCM staffers!

WILLY WONKA AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY WILLY WONKA ( 1971 )

ESSENTIALS

Poolside at The Hollywood Roosevelt HotelPoolside

Although it only made $4 million on its initial release, repeated television screenings have turned this musical fantasy into such a popular favorite that a 1996 reissue brought in $21 million. Adapted from Roald Dahl’s 1964 book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (the name was changed because “Charlie” was widely known as military slang for the Viet Cong), the film marked the Quaker Oats Company’s sole venture into film production. Dahl wanted British comic Spike Milligan to play Willy Wonka, but the producers chose Gene Wilder in a distinct change of pace from the frenetic neurotics he had been playing since his film debut in Bonnie and Clyde (1967). He proved to be an inspired choice, bringing a great deal of whimsy and physical agility to the role of a mysterious candy manufacturer who invites five children to tour his factory. Although Peter Ostrum, in his only movie role as Charlie, and Jack Albertson, as Charlie’s grandfather, are charming, the other real star of the film is art director Harper Goff. Filming in Munich, he turned the Wonka factory into a delectable flight of fantasy that had critic Roger Ebert likening the film to The Wizard of Oz (1939). (d. Mel Stuart, 100m, Digital)